Jun 9, 2017

06/09/2017: How much more chaos can one global economy stand?

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Oy. Right after the U.K. kicked off the two-year countdown to Brexit in March, Prime Minister Theresa May called for a snap election in hopes of getting a stronger majority in Parliament to negotiate the country’s exit from the European Union. That plan has backfired, leaving May with less support than she started with. We asked our London reporter for an update on the ground there. Then: We'll talk through the week in business and economic news — it's infrastructure week at the White House, remember? Plus, Taylor Swift and Spotify gave us a lesson in why you should never say, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together."

Segments From this episode

Is the UK facing parliamentary paralysis?

Jun 9, 2017
The election results mean May's leadership could be challenged, British pundits say.
Theresa May, British prime minister and Conservative Party leader, delivers a statement in London today after Conservatives lost their majority in a snap general election.
JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images

Taylor Swift tells streaming 'You Belong with Me,' and it's all about timing

Jun 9, 2017
Do you have a less-tortured Swift pun? Inquire within.
Taylor Swift performs during her "1989" world tour in Melbourne, Australia.
Graham Denholm/Getty Images

Is 2 percent a good target rate for inflation? The Fed has never been sure

by
Jun 9, 2017
It's an arbitrary target, and some experts say its time for a change.
U.S. Federal Reserve Board Chairwoman Janet Yellen testifying before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee in Washington, D.C.
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: How much more chaos can one global economy stand?

Jun 9, 2017
Sheelah Kolhatkar of The New Yorker and David Gura of Bloomberg join us to discuss the week’s business and economic news. With the stunning election results in Britain now final, we look at how the political turmoil will impact Brexit negotiations and if the European Union now has leverage. Then, we turn our attention to […]
National flags flutter near the the Elizabeth Tower, commonly referred to as Big Ben, in central London today.
GLYN KIRK/AFP/Getty Images

For British whistle-maker, the future is cloudy after the election

Jun 9, 2017
'The politicians have got to get their act together,' says Simon Topman of the Acme Whistle Co.
About half the factory workers at Acme Whistle Co. are immigrants.
Oli Scarff/Getty Images

Oy. Right after the U.K. kicked off the two-year countdown to Brexit in March, Prime Minister Theresa May called for a snap election in hopes of getting a stronger majority in Parliament to negotiate the country’s exit from the European Union. That plan has backfired, leaving May with less support than she started with. We asked our London reporter for an update on the ground there. Then: We’ll talk through the week in business and economic news — it’s infrastructure week at the White House, remember? Plus, Taylor Swift and Spotify gave us a lesson in why you should never say, “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together.”

Music from the episode

Falling - Psychemagik Remix HAIM, Psychemagik
Afria Talks to You Delicate Steve
Too Much Too Late Arms and Sleepers