Marketplace Morning Report for Tuesday, June 23, 2015
Jun 23, 2015

Marketplace Morning Report for Tuesday, June 23, 2015

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Airing on Tuesday, June 23, 2015: South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley declared that the Confederate flag should be removed from the statehouse grounds. Now, Wal-Mart is saying its removing all Confederate flag merchandise from its stores. More on that. And Congress gets to work this week figuring what to do with federal education funding for next year. A lot is on the chopping block, including grants for improving math and science education, and school safety, as well as Title I funds for low-income students. Plus, there’s an increasingly popular theory that underlying problems like poverty, addiction and social isolation drive some patients to be hospitalized and use the ER more. Some doctors, hospitals and insurance companies believe that by addressing those, you can improve health and save money. So why do skeptics outnumber the optimists?

 

Segments From this episode

Baltimore lab program produces a positive reaction

Jun 23, 2015
BioTechnical Institute says it trains grads for entry-level jobs with a future.
Dr. Wayne Butscher helps Jamond Turner complete a lab exercise. Students at the BioTechnical Institute of Maryland learn lab skills tuition free. The program grew out of Baltimore’s Empowerment Zone program.
Caitlin Esch

Proposed House bill slashes education funding

Jun 23, 2015
But there's little to no chance Obama will sign it into law.

Those sky-high fees for flying

Jun 23, 2015
Airlines now charge their customers a raft of fees for all sorts of things.

PODCAST: Fees, glorious fees

Jun 23, 2015
Bond markets, airline fees, and job training.

Airing on Tuesday, June 23, 2015: South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley declared that the Confederate flag should be removed from the statehouse grounds. Now, Wal-Mart is saying its removing all Confederate flag merchandise from its stores. More on that. And Congress gets to work this week figuring what to do with federal education funding for next year. A lot is on the chopping block, including grants for improving math and science education, and school safety, as well as Title I funds for low-income students. Plus, there’s an increasingly popular theory that underlying problems like poverty, addiction and social isolation drive some patients to be hospitalized and use the ER more. Some doctors, hospitals and insurance companies believe that by addressing those, you can improve health and save money. So why do skeptics outnumber the optimists?

 

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC