Marketplace Morning Report for Thursday, July 9, 2015
Jul 9, 2015

Marketplace Morning Report for Thursday, July 9, 2015

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Airing on Thursday, July 9, 2015: More on the Chinese government's multi-pronged effort to recover from the drop on the stock market there. Plus, the NLCB as a civil rights law was initially created as part of the War on Poverty. Parents and teachers are fed up with over testing, but without some kind of annual testing civil rights activists worry poor and minority kids will continue to be left behind. It looks like annual testing is here to stay, but states will have more leeway to decide how scores are used and what happens to consistently failing schools. And with comprehensive immigration reform' on hold until after the 2016 election at the earliest, business advocates are turning to a narrower agenda—pushing to get more legal immigrants admitted to work in the U.S. 

Segments From this episode

Front-of-the-store sales key to Walgreens growth

Jul 9, 2015
Walgreens wants to sell more non-pharmacy products, with higher profit margins.

Congress rewrites No Child Left Behind

Jul 9, 2015
Annual testing may be here to stay, but states are expected to have more leeway.

Do you want to build a ... ropes course?

Jul 9, 2015
Ski resorts are experimenting with warm weather attractions to bring in business.

Does the U.S. need more immigrant workers?

Jul 9, 2015
Some U.S. employers say more legal immigrants would help.

PODCAST: Glitch, don't kill my vibe

Jul 9, 2015
An update from Athens, more on the NYSE glitch, and ski resorts prepare for summer.

Yahoo bets on fantasy sports

Jul 9, 2015
Through a mobile app, Yahoo will now let fantasy sports players make daily bets.

Airing on Thursday, July 9, 2015: More on the Chinese government’s multi-pronged effort to recover from the drop on the stock market there. Plus, the NLCB as a civil rights law was initially created as part of the War on Poverty. Parents and teachers are fed up with over testing, but without some kind of annual testing civil rights activists worry poor and minority kids will continue to be left behind. It looks like annual testing is here to stay, but states will have more leeway to decide how scores are used and what happens to consistently failing schools. And with comprehensive immigration reform’ on hold until after the 2016 election at the earliest, business advocates are turning to a narrower agenda—pushing to get more legal immigrants admitted to work in the U.S. 

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC