May 12, 2017

05/12/2017: Planes, trains, automobiles and Trump

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross has announced that U.S. and China have reached a deal to open each other's markets up to one another — kinda. Which industries stand to benefit, and will this actually bode well for the future of their relationship? The BBC's Andrew Walker breaks it down for us. Afterwards, we'll look at the growing comparisons between the mortgage-lending crisis of 2008 and the current market for car loans, and then talk about the role private investors could play in the president's infrastructure plans.

Segments From this episode

Auto-loan market starting to spook lenders

May 12, 2017
The state of the auto loan market is causing some concern among analysts. Many are drawing comparisons with the mortgage-lending crisis that figured largely in the financial crash of 2008. At issue is the growing number of riskier, subprime loans. Default rates are going up too.  And lenders are starting to get spooked.  Click the […]

Outlet malls experiment with food and full-price stores to maintain growth

May 12, 2017
Outlets became part of our shopping lives during the recession. Now they're taking on the trappings of full-price malls.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Yale to help policymakers deal with the financial crisis in real time

May 12, 2017
Ever since the world economy broke in 2008, policymakers have looked for ways to keep it from breaking again. But there’s another important lesson to learn: how to put it back together. Yale University is creating a tool to offer real-time guidance to central bankers and others while they deal with a financial crisis.  Click […]

05/12/2017: How to handle a financial crisis

May 12, 2017
The U.S. and China have reached a deal to lower some of the barriers to trade between the countries. We'll take a look at what each country stands to gain from looser restrictions. Next, we'll explore Yale University's new guide on how to put economies back together, and then talk about how outlets are exploring a new business model that will include full-price stores.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross has announced that U.S. and China have reached a deal to open each other’s markets up to one another — kinda. Which industries stand to benefit, and will this actually bode well for the future of their relationship? The BBC’s Andrew Walker breaks it down for us. Afterwards, we’ll look at the growing comparisons between the mortgage-lending crisis of 2008 and the current market for car loans, and then talk about the role private investors could play in the president’s infrastructure plans.

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC