Chris Farrell

Economics Editor

SHORT BIO

Chris Farrell is economics editor of Marketplace Money, a nationally syndicated one-hour weekly personal finance show produced by American Public Media. Chris is also economics correspondent for Marketplace, the largest business program in broadcasting and chief economics correspondent for American RadioWorks, the largest producer of long-form documentaries in public radio. He is also contributing economics editor at Business Week magazine. He was host and executive editor of public television’s Right on the Money. He is the author of two books: Right on the Money: Taking Control of Your Personal Finances, and Deflation: What Happens When Prices Fall. Chris is a graduate of Stanford and the London School of Economics.

Latest Stories (2,326)

The rules for required retirement account withdrawals

Rules for the required minimum distribution, as it's called, changed both before and during the pandemic.
Pixabay

COVID unemployment is causing a serious funding issue for Medicare

Medicare’s hospital insurance trust fund is projected to become insolvent sooner than expected — within three to five years.
The pandemic recession has pushed so many people out of work that funding for Medicare Part A, via payroll taxes, is down.
FG Trade via Getty Images

How serious is our declining population growth problem?

The implications of a shrinking population on our economic growth are potentially big, but Marketplace senior economic contributor Chris Farrell thinks there's some solutions to tap.
Embracing technology during the pandemic could help, says Chris Farrell.
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Oregon retirement savings program offers national roadmap

Economists found the automatic IRA program OregonSaves meaningfully increased retirement savings.
The success of OregonSaves, an automatic IRA program, suggests making it a national plan.
Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Despite more savings, American households still have a lot of debt

Who's taking on debt for what reasons, and why paying it down is good for your financial and mental health.
Recent data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York shows the overall amount of household debt increased steadily in 2020.
Chainarong Prasertthai via Getty Images

Is the GameStop saga a sign of a stock market bubble?

One thing that bubbles have in common? The unpredictable consequences of economy-wide innovations.
speculative fevers often emerge during times of major economic and technological change. "And in essence, these speculators are accelerating the rise of a new economy," says Marketplace senior economics contributor Chris Farrell.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Multigenerational households make good economic sense

The most recent numbers we have show 20% of the American population is living in multigenerational households.
"The multigenerational home is a safety net, yes. But the bigger story is the compelling economics of multiple generations living under one roof," says Marketplace senior economics contributor Chris Farrell.
Morsa Images via Getty Images

Momentum builds for Biden to cancel student loan debt

Marketplace senior economics contributor Chris Farrell thinks it's become a matter of when and how much debt will be canceled.
How much student loan debt might the Biden administration cancel? Marketplace senior economics contributor Chris Farrell says people are coalescing around the idea of $10,000.
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

With Biden, could we be headed toward tougher standards for financial advisers?

Biden's platform touches on toughening rules that make financial advisers legally obligated to put clients' interests first.
ridvan_celik via Getty Images

Pre-filled tax forms would save Americans time and money, research says

"Return free filing" is something 36 countries already do.
Zach Gibson/Getty Images