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My Economy

This immigrant small businessman brings a taste of Bolivia to his community

Sofia Terenzio Apr 12, 2024
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Adrian Espinoza, owner of Empanada Club in Portland, Maine, makes and sells Bolivian style empanadas at farmers markets, festivals and through his online shop. Courtesy Espinoza
My Economy

This immigrant small businessman brings a taste of Bolivia to his community

Sofia Terenzio Apr 12, 2024
Heard on:
Adrian Espinoza, owner of Empanada Club in Portland, Maine, makes and sells Bolivian style empanadas at farmers markets, festivals and through his online shop. Courtesy Espinoza
HTML EMBED:
COPY

My Economy” tells the story of the new economic normal through the eyes of people trying to make it, because we know the only numbers that really matter are the ones in your economy.

Adrian Espinoza, the owner of Empanada Club in Portland, Maine, moved to the United States eight years ago from Bolivia. When he came to this country, the first job he could find was in a restaurant. Despite not knowing how to cook, he quickly learned and grew to love it. In 2018, he opened his small business selling Bolivian-style empanadas.

Just like many small-business owners, Espinoza has been dealing with rising costs in the last few years.

“I switched from $600 a month to $750 a month,” Espinoza said about the rent at the commercial kitchen he works out of. “It’s a challenge, you know, to keep up because it’s not the only expense that went up.” To account for the higher costs, Espinoza has had to raise the prices of his empanadas.

Despite these challenges, Espinoza said he feels “really happy” with himself when he looks at how far his business has come. You can find him chatting with customers and selling his empanadas at farmers markets, festivals and breweries.

Click the audio player above to hear Espinoza‘s story.

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