COVID-19

Summer looks different for musicians this year

Andie Corban Jul 2, 2020
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A stage in Las Vegas in 2015. In 2020, it's hard for musicians to find performance venues. Ethan Miller/Getty Images
COVID-19

Summer looks different for musicians this year

Andie Corban Jul 2, 2020
Heard on:
A stage in Las Vegas in 2015. In 2020, it's hard for musicians to find performance venues. Ethan Miller/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Chicago-based musician Seth Shulman has been out of work since March, when the school he teaches music lessons at shut down and gig work ended.

“Unemployment [insurance] didn’t really work out so well,” Shulman said. “I’ve been calling them back and trying to figure something out, but it doesn’t look so good.”

Since March, Shulman has been teaching music lessons online. Now he has around 20 students. “Teaching is keeping me alive,” he said. “I could always use more students just to keep my car payments and student loans going, which I’ve deferred on. It’s nice that you can do that, but I just really want to get those things paid off and not have that haunt my life for the next 20 years.”

As we head into July, Shulman’s summer is looking a bit different from the usual. He said he typically plays three to five gigs a week, most of which aren’t happening this year because of the coronavirus. However, he and his band recently did a show in Los Angeles at the Whiskey a Go Go.

“It’s a pretty famous venue, and they offered us to do a livestream there,” Shulman said. “In our show, we’re a tribute band, and there’s usually a whole crowd part which really couldn’t happen. So, you just kind of have to pretend that you’re in front of people. You technically are, but you’re not. It’s super-bizarre.”

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