COVID-19

Offices prepare for post-virus return to work

Meghan McCarty Carino Apr 22, 2020
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Workspaces where people sit across from each other might not be the best idea when we return to work. Oli Scarff/Getty Images
COVID-19

Offices prepare for post-virus return to work

Meghan McCarty Carino Apr 22, 2020
Workspaces where people sit across from each other might not be the best idea when we return to work. Oli Scarff/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
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We’re beginning to see signs of planning for reopening some parts of the economy, sooner in some places than others. But business will probably look pretty different: restaurant tables spaced out 6 feet apart, widespread masks and touchless payment systems. For the tens of millions of Americans who work at desk jobs, office space could be transformed.

Ramon Peralta heads his own creative agency, Peralta Design in Shelton, Connecticut, and has always taken pride in his stylish headquarters.

“You know, beautiful office campus, glass conference room, all the amenities,” he said. Of course it has the popular open floor plan, which is newly imbued with a sense of danger.

“We may consider doing some plexiglass dividers or kind of cough shields,” he said.

Workstations facing each other might be turned apart, the fun game room repurposed into a solo office and the whole space will get more frequent and deeper cleanings when his team eventually returns. 

Some workers have already returned to offices in China run by commercial real estate company Cushman & Wakefield. Despina Katsikakis has been helping put together best practices for its global offices using the experience in China as a model.

“We’re working to test a lot of hands-free technology,” she said, including automated infrared temperature checks, facial recognition or QR code entries and voice-activated elevators.

Buildings will also need improved air flow, said Joseph G. Allen, a professor of environmental health at Harvard University and author of the book “Healthy Buildings.”

“You bring in more outdoor air and you dilute anything that’s indoor air,” he said. “And, of course, if you a partner that with enhanced filtration, you can actually capture virus particles and other particles.”

If windows can be opened, they should be, he said. If not, ventilation systems should be adjusted to bring in more air as most are currently set to adhere to standards geared toward energy efficiency rather than health.

But maybe the biggest change will be workers who don’t want to return to the office, at least on a regular basis. Creative agency director Peralta is preparing for that.

“If they don’t feel comfortable coming in, they won’t have to,” he said.

Of course, not all companies can operate with workers staying home long term, and there are plenty of workers that will welcome a return to a workplace free of the challenges of home.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What’s the latest on the extra COVID-19 unemployment benefits?

As of now, those $600-a-week payments will stop at the end of July. For many, unemployment payments have been a lifeline, but one that is about to end, if nothing changes. The debate over whether or not to extend these benefits continues among lawmakers.

With a spike in the number of COVID-19 cases, are restaurants and bars shutting back down?

The latest jobs report shows that 4.8 million Americans went back to work in June. More than 30% of those job gains were from bars and restaurants. But those industries are in trouble again. For example, because of the steep rise in COVID-19 cases in Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, increased restrictions on restaurant capacities and closed bars. It’s created a logistical nightmare.

Which businesses got Paycheck Protection Program loans?

The numbers are in — well, at least in part. The federal government has released the names of companies that received loans of $150,000 or more through the Paycheck Protection Program.

Some of the companies people are surprised got loans include Kanye West’s fashion line, Yeezy, TGI Fridays and P.F. Chang’s. The companies you might not recognize, particularly some smaller businesses, were able to hire back staff or partially reopen thanks to the loans.

You can find answers to more questions on unemployment benefits and COVID-19 here.

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