COVID-19

Offices prepare for post-virus return to work

Meghan McCarty Carino Apr 22, 2020
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Workspaces where people sit across from each other might not be the best idea when we return to work. Oli Scarff/Getty Images
COVID-19

Offices prepare for post-virus return to work

Meghan McCarty Carino Apr 22, 2020
Workspaces where people sit across from each other might not be the best idea when we return to work. Oli Scarff/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
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We’re beginning to see signs of planning for reopening some parts of the economy, sooner in some places than others. But business will probably look pretty different: restaurant tables spaced out 6 feet apart, widespread masks and touchless payment systems. For the tens of millions of Americans who work at desk jobs, office space could be transformed.

Ramon Peralta heads his own creative agency, Peralta Design in Shelton, Connecticut, and has always taken pride in his stylish headquarters.

“You know, beautiful office campus, glass conference room, all the amenities,” he said. Of course it has the popular open floor plan, which is newly imbued with a sense of danger.

“We may consider doing some plexiglass dividers or kind of cough shields,” he said.

Workstations facing each other might be turned apart, the fun game room repurposed into a solo office and the whole space will get more frequent and deeper cleanings when his team eventually returns. 

Some workers have already returned to offices in China run by commercial real estate company Cushman & Wakefield. Despina Katsikakis has been helping put together best practices for its global offices using the experience in China as a model.

“We’re working to test a lot of hands-free technology,” she said, including automated infrared temperature checks, facial recognition or QR code entries and voice-activated elevators.

Buildings will also need improved air flow, said Joseph G. Allen, a professor of environmental health at Harvard University and author of the book “Healthy Buildings.”

“You bring in more outdoor air and you dilute anything that’s indoor air,” he said. “And, of course, if you a partner that with enhanced filtration, you can actually capture virus particles and other particles.”

If windows can be opened, they should be, he said. If not, ventilation systems should be adjusted to bring in more air as most are currently set to adhere to standards geared toward energy efficiency rather than health.

But maybe the biggest change will be workers who don’t want to return to the office, at least on a regular basis. Creative agency director Peralta is preparing for that.

“If they don’t feel comfortable coming in, they won’t have to,” he said.

Of course, not all companies can operate with workers staying home long term, and there are plenty of workers that will welcome a return to a workplace free of the challenges of home.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

Millions of Americans are unemployed, but businesses say they are having trouble hiring. Why?

This economic crisis is unusual compared to traditional recessions, according to Daniel Zhao, senior economist with Glassdoor. “Many workers are still sitting out of the labor force because of health concerns or child care needs, and that makes it tough to find workers regardless of what you’re doing with wages or benefits,” Zhao said. “An extra dollar an hour isn’t going to make a cashier with preexisting conditions feel that it’s safe to return to work.” This can be seen in the restaurant industry: Some workers have quit or are reluctant to apply because of COVID-19 concerns, low pay, meager benefits and the stress that comes with a fast-paced, demanding job. Restaurants have been willing to offer signing bonuses and temporary wage increases. One McDonald’s is even paying people $50 just to interview.

Could waiving patents increase the global supply of COVID-19 vaccines?

India and South Africa have introduced a proposal to temporarily suspend patents on COVID-19 vaccines. Backers of the plan say it would increase the supply of vaccines around the world by allowing more countries to produce them. Skeptics say it’s not that simple. There’s now enough supply in the U.S that any adult who wants a shot should be able to get one soon. That reality is years away for most other countries. More than 100 countries have backed the proposal to temporarily waive COVID-19 vaccine patents. The U.S isn’t one of them, but the White House has said it’s considering the idea.

Can businesses deny you entry if you don’t have a vaccine passport?

As more Americans get vaccinated against COVID-19 and the economy begins reopening, some businesses are requiring proof of vaccination to enter their premises. The concept of a vaccine passport has raised ethical questions about data privacy and potential discrimination against the unvaccinated. However, legal experts say businesses have the right to deny entrance to those who can’t show proof.

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