COVID-19

How do we get the economy back to normal? “Extremely cautiously,” says Economist editor in chief

David Brancaccio, Meredith Garretson, Candace Manriquez Wrenn, and Daniel Shin Apr 17, 2020
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Travelers, some in protective gear, walk through John F. Kennedy Airport (JFK) as it stands mostly empty due to the ongoing cutbacks in travel because of the coronavirus on April 16, 2020 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images
COVID-19

How do we get the economy back to normal? “Extremely cautiously,” says Economist editor in chief

David Brancaccio, Meredith Garretson, Candace Manriquez Wrenn, and Daniel Shin Apr 17, 2020
Travelers, some in protective gear, walk through John F. Kennedy Airport (JFK) as it stands mostly empty due to the ongoing cutbacks in travel because of the coronavirus on April 16, 2020 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images
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President Donald Trump and the federal government have set the framework for how the U.S. might get back to work as a nation after a season of sheltering in place.

How have countries around the world handled such a task? Zanny Minton Beddoes, editor in chief of The Economist, has the global perspective.

“Everybody is thinking about it,” she told “Marketplace Morning Report” host David Brancaccio. “But most of the world is still incredibly susceptible to a second wave of the virus. Most people haven’t been exposed to this virus.”

The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Zanny Minton Beddoes: I think the economy has been put, effectively, into a medically induced coma, and so how do you bring the economy out of it? And you do it as you do with patients, extremely cautiously. The reason we’re thinking about this already is because we’re seeing the alarming cost of the lockdown, economic cost of the lockdown, which is huge, but it’s also going to get a lot bigger very fast. And I was very struck this week with the International Monetary Fund’s forecasts, where they already say that we, this year, are going to see the biggest downturn since the Great Depression, 3% shrinking of global GDP. But that is predicated on economies opening up. If, however, the lockdown continues into the third quarter of this year, they expect the size of that downtime to double to 6%.

David Brancaccio: Can we learn from strategies in other countries? Germany’s already thinking very specifically about ways to get workers back.

Minton Beddoes: We can. I mean, everybody is thinking about it. But most of the world is still incredibly susceptible to a second wave of the virus. Most people haven’t been exposed to this virus. And, I suspect, governments will be reaching different positions on three different parameters, and that’s going to affect it. And the first, and I think by far the most important, is the ability to test, because the only way that you’re going to know whether you’ve got a resurgence in the rate of infections is by having huge amounts of testing. But the second is really, really effective ways of contact tracing, so that once you test and you find someone who has been exposed to the virus, you can actually then trace all the people that they have been in touch with. And then the third sort of set of parameters is, what do you actually ease first? You know, do you open schools first? Do you allow shops to open?

Brancaccio: I suppose another question is what we reopen to. It’s not just going to be the old way of doing things.

Minton Beddoes: That’s exactly right. And it’s not going to get back to normal until we have a vaccine or an effective treatment that is very widespread. And that’s going to be a year, or 18 months, or longer. It’s a normal, I think, of wearing masks in public. It’s a normal where restaurants, if they are open, have tables set much further apart. It’s a normal where factories are reconfigured so that people on assembly lines are far apart from each other. And if you look at what’s going on in the Chinese economy, although it has come back dramatically from where it was, it’s operating, perhaps, at 90% capacity, which is still a dramatic downturn relative to where the Chinese economy was. And so I think we’re not going to go back to anything like what we had, you know, even six weeks ago in the short term.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

How many people are flying? Has traveled picked up?

Flying is starting to recover to levels the airline industry hasn’t seen in months. The Transportation Security Administration announced on Oct. 19 that it’s screened more than 1 million passengers on a single day — its highest number since March 17. The TSA also screened more than 6 million passengers last week, its highest weekly volume since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. While travel is improving, the TSA announcement comes amid warnings that the U.S. is in the third wave of the coronavirus. There are now more than 8 million cases in the country, with more than 219,000 deaths.

How are Americans feeling about their finances?

Nearly half of all Americans would have trouble paying for an unexpected $250 bill and a third of Americans have less income than before the pandemic, according to the latest results of our Marketplace-Edison Poll. Also, 6 in 10 Americans think that race has at least some impact on an individual’s long-term financial situation, but Black respondents are much more likely to think that race has a big impact on a person’s long-term financial situation than white or Hispanic/Latinx respondents.

Find the rest of the poll results here, which cover how Americans have been faring financially about six months into the pandemic, race and equity within the workplace and some of the key issues Trump and Biden supporters are concerned about.

What’s going to happen to retailers, especially with the holiday shopping season approaching?

A report out recently from the accounting consultancy BDO USA said 29 big retailers filed for bankruptcy protection through August. And if bankruptcies continue at that pace, the number could rival the bankruptcies of 2010, after the Great Recession. For retailers, the last three months of this year will be even more critical than usual for their survival as they look for some hope around the holidays.

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