COVID-19

In emergency move, Fed cuts interest rates by 0.5%

David Brancaccio Mar 3, 2020
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An interest rate cut that occurs between formal policy meetings is highly unusual. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images
COVID-19

In emergency move, Fed cuts interest rates by 0.5%

David Brancaccio Mar 3, 2020
An interest rate cut that occurs between formal policy meetings is highly unusual. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

The Federal Reserve this morning cut interest rates by half a percentage point. For this to happen between formal policy meetings is highly unusual and an indication of the emergency driving the decision.

What’s called the “federal funds rate,” the main way central bankers add or remove liquidity into the financial system, was already low, and now it will be managed to stay between just 1% and 1.25%.

The Fed’s policymaking committee was unanimous in its decision. The Fed says it will continue to closely monitor the COVID-19 outbreak and use appropriate tools to support the economy.

To make sense of the cut, we spoke with Karen Petrou, managing partner of the Washington-based economic consulting firm Federal Financial Analytics.

David Brancaccio: OK, surprise. Not even after a scheduled meeting of Fed policymakers. Are you reassured they’re taking action, or maybe scared they even had to do this?

Karen Petrou: I’m troubled that they did, because I really think that the Fed is responding not to the economy, let alone to any kind of liquidity concerns or structural stress, but to the market. And I really hate to see the central bank continue to exercise what used to be called the “Greenspan put,” now it’s become the “Powell put” — that when markets are shaky, the Fed steps in and rescues the traders. That’s not what a central bank is for.

Brancaccio: Yeah, because now the traders are going to know the Fed is watching their back very closely.

Petrou: And a market that runs on moral hazard runs on fumes. I would like to see some market recognition of — we’re supposed to have efficient markets with traders recognizing forward-looking values. That’s not what we’re doing. Everybody’s trading on the Fed. And that is, ultimately, a dangerous game.

Brancaccio: And you’ve had some questions about whether or not cutting interest rates actually helps the problem at hand, which is trying to help the world economy through concerns about the coronavirus.

Petrou: I think it has virtually nothing to do with it. Unless the Fed figures out how to get in the face mask manufacturing business, or figures out a way to buy tons of copper to support the supply chain. What the Fed is supposed to do is supply liquidity to the financial market and ensure a stable economy, by way of maximum employment and price stability. At this point, there’s no reason to intervene. Now I know people will argue, “Well, you need to intervene early because it takes a while for monetary policy to transit through the economy.” But the problem is the economy’s problems have nothing to do with the cost of money, which is already at extra record lows. It has to do with real world contagion and a virus. A half a point is not going to cure anybody.

Clarification (March 3, 2020): This story has been updated to more clearly describe the nature of the rate cut.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

Can businesses deny you entry if you don’t have a vaccine passport?

As more Americans get vaccinated against COVID-19 and the economy begins reopening, some businesses are requiring proof of vaccination to enter their premises. The concept of a vaccine passport has raised ethical questions about data privacy and potential discrimination against the unvaccinated. However, legal experts say businesses have the right to deny entrance to those who can’t show proof.

Give me a snapshot of the labor market in the U.S.

U.S. job openings in February increased more than expected, according to the Labor Department. Also, the economy added over 900,000 jobs in March. For all of the good jobs news recently, there are still nearly 10 million people who are out of work, and more than 4 million of them have been unemployed for six months or longer. “So we still have a very long way to go until we get a full recovery,” said Elise Gould with the Economic Policy Institute. She said the industries that have the furthest to go are the ones you’d expect: “leisure and hospitality, accommodations, food services, restaurants” and the public sector, especially in education.

What do I need to know about tax season this year?

Glad you asked! We have a whole separate FAQ section on that. Some quick hits: The deadline has been extended from April 15 to May 17 for individuals. Also, millions of people received unemployment benefits in 2020 — up to $10,200 of which will now be tax-free for those with an adjusted gross income of less than $150,000. And, for those who filed before the American Rescue Plan passed, simply put, you do not need to file an amended return at the moment. Find answers to the rest of your questions here.

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