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Movie industry puts pressure on Georgia’s abortion bill

Susanna Capelouto Apr 18, 2019
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Actors like Alyssa Milano, who is currently working in Georgia on the Netflix series "Insatiable," have spoken out against the state's so-called "heartbeat bill" and threatened not to work in Georgia if the bill is made into law.
Rich Fury/Getty Images

Thanks to lucrative tax incentives and investments by the state to lure production, Georgia has a vibrant film industry. Lately, the swaying power of that industry is being tested. Lawmakers in the state passed a so-called “heart beat” bill that would restrict abortions once a pulse is detected in an embryo. Actors like Alyssa Milano, who is currently working in Georgia on the Netflix series “Insatiable,” have spoken out against the measure and threatened not to work in Georgia if the bill is made law.

Republican governor Brian Kemp has said he supports the bill, but has not yet signed it into law. Kemp last year told the Atlanta Journal Constitution that he is not concerned about what Hollywood thinks. However, Georgia has become a top movie-producing state, with supporting infrastructure that includes studio space and skilled crews. The state estimates that more than 92,000 jobs depend on the movie business, and those who work in the industry worry that producers and directors could decide to go elsewhere.

States like Illinois, Michigan and New Jersey were quick to indicate that they’d welcome some of Georgia’s movie business. 

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