COVID-19

Georgia businesses weigh options as governor allows some to reopen

Emma Hurt Apr 27, 2020
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Toni Williams-Tazel, owner of All About Hair in Atlanta, has decided it’s not safe to reopen her salon despite the green light from the state government. Courtesy Toni Williams-Tazel
COVID-19

Georgia businesses weigh options as governor allows some to reopen

Emma Hurt Apr 27, 2020
Toni Williams-Tazel, owner of All About Hair in Atlanta, has decided it’s not safe to reopen her salon despite the green light from the state government. Courtesy Toni Williams-Tazel
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Toni Williams-Tazel has owned her Atlanta salon for more than 20 years. (Photo courtesy of Williams-Tazel)

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp has allowed some businesses to reopen for basic operations after a COVID-19-related lockdown. The businesses still need to maintain social distancing and follow sanitation guidelines.

Hair and nail salons, gyms, fitness centers and bowling alleys were the first to be allowed to open on Friday. April 24, and dine-in restaurants and theaters come next. But, as Kemp said, it’s up to the private sector to convince customers that it’s safe to return.

Business owners across the state are weighing whether they can do that, and if so, how to reopen safely for their employees and customers.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

When does the expanded COVID-19 unemployment insurance run out?

The CARES Act, passed by Congress and signed by President Donald Trump in March, authorized extra unemployment payments, increasing the amount of money, and broadening who qualifies. The increased unemployment benefits have an expiration date — an extra $600 per week the act authorized ends on July 31.

Which states are reopening?

Many states have started to relax the restrictions put in place in order to slow the spread of COVID-19. Although social-distancing measures still hold virtually everywhere in the country, more than half of states have started to phase out stay-at-home orders and phase in business reopenings. Others, like New York, are on slower timelines.

Is it worth applying for a job right now?

It never hurts to look, but as unemployment reaches levels last seen during the Great Depression and most available jobs are in places that carry risks like the supermarket or warehouses, it isn’t a bad idea to sit tight either, if you can.

You can find answers to more questions here.

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