COVID-19

Georgia businesses weigh options as governor allows some to reopen

Emma Hurt Apr 27, 2020
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Toni Williams-Tazel, owner of All About Hair in Atlanta, has decided it’s not safe to reopen her salon despite the green light from the state government. Courtesy Toni Williams-Tazel
COVID-19

Georgia businesses weigh options as governor allows some to reopen

Emma Hurt Apr 27, 2020
Toni Williams-Tazel, owner of All About Hair in Atlanta, has decided it’s not safe to reopen her salon despite the green light from the state government. Courtesy Toni Williams-Tazel
HTML EMBED:
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Toni Williams-Tazel has owned her Atlanta salon for more than 20 years. (Photo courtesy of Williams-Tazel)

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp has allowed some businesses to reopen for basic operations after a COVID-19-related lockdown. The businesses still need to maintain social distancing and follow sanitation guidelines.

Hair and nail salons, gyms, fitness centers and bowling alleys were the first to be allowed to open on Friday. April 24, and dine-in restaurants and theaters come next. But, as Kemp said, it’s up to the private sector to convince customers that it’s safe to return.

Business owners across the state are weighing whether they can do that, and if so, how to reopen safely for their employees and customers.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

New COVID-19 cases and deaths in the U.S. are on the rise. How are Americans reacting?

Johns Hopkins University reports the seven-day average of new cases hit 68,767 on Sunday  — a record — eclipsing the previous record hit in late July during the second, summer wave of infection. A funny thing is happening with consumers though: Even as COVID-19 cases rise, Americans don’t appear to be shying away from stepping indoors to shop or eat or exercise. Morning Consult asked consumers how comfortable they feel going out to eat, to the shopping mall or on a vacation. And their willingness has been rising. Surveys find consumers’ attitudes vary by age and income, and by political affiliation, said Chris Jackson, who heads up polling at Ipsos.

How many people are flying? Has traveled picked up?

Flying is starting to recover to levels the airline industry hasn’t seen in months. The Transportation Security Administration announced on Oct. 19 that it’s screened more than 1 million passengers on a single day — its highest number since March 17. The TSA also screened more than 6 million passengers last week, its highest weekly volume since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. While travel is improving, the TSA announcement comes amid warnings that the U.S. is in the third wave of the coronavirus. There are now more than 8 million cases in the country, with more than 219,000 deaths.

How are Americans feeling about their finances?

Nearly half of all Americans would have trouble paying for an unexpected $250 bill and a third of Americans have less income than before the pandemic, according to the latest results of our Marketplace-Edison Poll. Also, 6 in 10 Americans think that race has at least some impact on an individual’s long-term financial situation, but Black respondents are much more likely to think that race has a big impact on a person’s long-term financial situation than white or Hispanic/Latinx respondents.

Find the rest of the poll results here, which cover how Americans have been faring financially about six months into the pandemic, race and equity within the workplace and some of the key issues Trump and Biden supporters are concerned about.

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