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The online campaign for votes in the 2016 election

Molly Wood and Eliza Mills Aug 19, 2016
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Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump leaves after speaking during his campaign event at the Ocean Center Convention Center on August 3, 2016 in Daytona, Florida.  Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The online campaign for votes in the 2016 election

Molly Wood and Eliza Mills Aug 19, 2016
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump leaves after speaking during his campaign event at the Ocean Center Convention Center on August 3, 2016 in Daytona, Florida.  Joe Raedle/Getty Images
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The 2016 election marches on, with Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton battling for voters in televised addresses, in swing states and online.

Social media was a fairly novel element in the 2008 election and more noticible in 2012. This year, it is fully incorporated into the election, with campaign staffers tweeting speeches and polls, candidates hosting conversations on Facebook and everyone documenting the election on Instagram.

While Clinton has been fairly traditional, Donald Trump’s use of social media has been different — and sometimes divisive. How do the candidates reconcile their online personas with their personal brands? And how important is an online following to returns at the ballot box? 

Zeynep Tufekci, professor at the University of North Carolina, joined Marketplace Weekend to discuss social media and the campaigns. 

To listen to the full interview, tune in using the player above. 

 

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