Some residents used burned trees to rebuild in Bastrop

Andy Uhler Oct 19, 2015
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Some residents used burned trees to rebuild in Bastrop

Andy Uhler Oct 19, 2015
HTML EMBED:
COPY

In Bastrop County, Texas, this past week more than 50 homes were destroyed and 4,500 acres burned in what’s being called the Hidden Pines fire. It’s about 70 percent contained now, but residents weren’t surprised it happened in the first place. Four years ago, that same county had the most destructive fire to ever hit Texas. Some residents packed up what was left and moved out. Some, like Kay Rogers, rebuilt.

Rogers bought 40 acres in Bastrop in the late 1970s because she said nearby Austin was getting too crowded. After the fire over Labor Day weekend in 2011, she lived in a camper next to the only thing left standing, her chimney. She said she didn’t think she would rebuild, and even visited Arkansas and North Carolina to scout out places to relocate. But then something changed.

She spoke with a friend who told Rogers she was taking some wood over to the sawmill in town. Rogers called the mill and asked if they could mill some of the trees that had burned in the fire. Click on the video above to hear and see what happened next.

We’re here to help you navigate this changed world and economy.

Our mission at Marketplace is to raise the economic intelligence of the country. It’s a tough task, but it’s never been more important.

In the past year, we’ve seen record unemployment, stimulus bills, and reddit users influencing the stock market. Marketplace helps you understand it all, will fact-based, approachable, and unbiased reporting.

Generous support from listeners and readers is what powers our nonprofit news—and your donation today will help provide this essential service. For just $5/month, you can sustain independent journalism that keeps you and thousands of others informed.