Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

A history of Take our Daughters to Work — and why it now includes sons

Stacey Vanek Smith Apr 25, 2013
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
President Barack Obama, daughters Malia (R) and Sasha sing 'Happy Birthday' to First Lady Michelle Obama as they arrive to take part in a community service project at Stuart Hobson Middle School in celebration of the Martin Luther King, Jr. day of service in Washington, DC, on January 17, 2011.
JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

Today is Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day, when parents host their kids at the office to expand their career horizons. Originally called Take Our Daughters to Work Day, the event was founded in 1993 by Gloria Steinem and the Ms. Foundation for Women.

“The effects were explosive,” recalls Marie Wilson, who was president of the Ms. Foundation at the time. “First of all, the visibility of girls in the workplace showed up the invisibility of adult women.”

Wilson says countless women have told her that going to work with a parent or other adult shaped their careers. Still, many critics say girls no longer need to be singled out. After all, women now make up half the American workforce.

“It’s becoming a little archaic,” says Susan Heathfield, a human resources expert. “My personal preference would be Take Your Child to Work Day.”

In fact, the day’s official title was changed in 2003 to Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day. Still, Ms. Foundation’s Wilson thinks a day that focuses on women’s role in the workplace is still relevant.

“Women are still far behind in leadership in every area,” she says, pointing out that American women hold fewer than 20 percent of leadership jobs and make about 77 cents for every dollar a man makes.                  

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.