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Derek Fisher, president of the National Basketball Players Association is surrounded by NBA players Ray Allen, Paul Pierce and Baron Davis as he speaks at a press conference after NBA labor negotiations in New York City. Michael Cohen/Getty Images
Mid-day Update

Mid-day Extra: NBA labor dispute breaks down because of "tiny things"

Mary Dooe Nov 15, 2011
Derek Fisher, president of the National Basketball Players Association is surrounded by NBA players Ray Allen, Paul Pierce and Baron Davis as he speaks at a press conference after NBA labor negotiations in New York City. Michael Cohen/Getty Images

The NBA lockout saga continues today, and it looks like the players are ready to take things to court after negotiations have failed yet again. Collective bargaining has broken down and it looks like the season really might not happen.

Some of these players have even been venturing out, trying other careers on for size. According to the Wall Street journal, for example, Carmelo Anthony of the New York Knicks has been doing some acting on Law and Order SVU and Nurse Jackie. Michael Beasley of the Minnesota Timberwolves has taken up ballet. And Drew Gooden of the Milwaukee Bucks is scouting locations for a chicken wings franchise, which aims to take chicken wings to a whole new level.

In today’s Mid-day Extra, we ask: What will happen to the NBA, and its players?

For answers, we went to Henry Abbott, writer of the True Hoop blog for ESPN. He has some predictions for how this season will actually play out.

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