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Egyptian protests aren't all bad for business

Opponents of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi gather during a protest calling for his ouster at Cairo's landmark Tahrir Square, on July 2, 2013.

Supporters and opponents of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi continue to gather in Cairo today. Protests began on Sunday, which in Egypt is a workday, resulting in a virtual shutdown of many local businesses for the third straight business day.

Kimberly Adams, a freelance journalist based in Cairo, reported the disruption is affecting everyday activities like going to the bank and shopping.

Adams said because of the current instability, many Egyptians are eagerly awaiting for the military to take over.

"People here are protest-weary," said Adams. "A lot of people are just tired of it. They're tired of their food prices going up, they're tired of waiting in long lines for gasoline, and they're tired of not knowing what's coming the next day. That's one of the reasons why all these businesses are shut down."

But even though some businesses are struggling, Adams said there's a "protest industry" that's seeing some positive effects. Street vendors selling food, water bottles, and "V for Vendetta" masks are doing quite well right now.

About the author

Kai Ryssdal is the host and senior editor of Marketplace, public radio’s program on business and the economy.

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