Is Fannie or Freddie in your portfolio?

Signs at Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac buildings

INSTITUTIONAL HOLDINGS IN FANNIE MAE

As of June 30, 2008 there were 1.076 billion common shares
outstanding according to Fannie's latest quarterly filing.

Institution Number of shares
Alliance Bernstein LP 134.17 million as of June 30
Dodge & Cox Inc 119.81 million as of July 31
Capital Research Global Investors 116.9 million as of June 30
Fidelity Management & Research 56.62 million as of June 30
Lord Abbett & Co 48.89 million as of June 30
Citigroup Global Markets 47.59 million as of June 30
Barclays Global Investors 43.58 million as of June 30
Merrill Lynch 41.66 million as of June 30
State Street Global Advisors 34.73 million as of June 30
Vanguard Group 32.99 million as of June 30

INSTITUTIONAL HOLDINGS IN FREDDIE MAC

As of July 28, 2008 there were 647 million common shares
outstanding according to Freddie's latest quarterly filing.

Institution Number of shares
Legg Mason 79.88 million as of July 31
Capital Research 64.87 million as of June 30
Alliance Bernstein 41.03 million as of June 30
Pzena Investment Management 33.41 million as of June 30
Hotchkis & Wiley Capital 30.7 million as of June 30
Citigroup Global Markets 28.96 million as of June 30
Capital World Investors 28.96 million as of June 30
Barclays Global Investors 26.51 million as of June 30
Brandes Investment Partners 25.86 million as of June 30
Fidelity Management & Research 21.98 million as of June 30

TEXT OF INTERVIEW

KAI RYSSDAL: Henry Paulson cost me more than $400 yesterday. Just reached right into my retirement account and took it. Not literally. But he might as well have.

As we told you yesterday, his decision to have the government take over Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac sent stock investors running for the door. The two company's share prices dropped about 80 percent. After we got off the air yesterday I got to wondering whether my retirement funds had any Fannie or Freddie in them. Ten minutes and some online research later I discovered my account was $447 worse off than when the day began. That prompted me to ask Tess Vigeland to come by and talk about how many others might be in the same boat.

Hi, Tess.

VIGELAND: Hello, Kai. Boy, that buys a lot of diapers, doesn't it?

RYSSDAL: 447 bucks. I mean, you gotta be kidding me. But, obviously, I'm not the only one, right?

VIGELAND: You are not. Of course all this depends on where you're invested, who you're invested with, but let's look at a couple of examples for folks. Start with Dodge and Cox, a very popular investment firm. Second-largest institutional holder of Fannie Mae stock -- almost 120 million shares as of July 31st. Now, as of last Friday, the final trading day before all this happened, the company says that Fannie Mae made up 0.7 percent of their balanced fund, a full percent of their stock fund, 1.7 percent of their global stock fund. So, if you have any of those, you can do the math based on your own portfolio. Here's the kicker, though. They went on a Fannie spree recently. According to Morningstar, Dodge and Cox's stock fund and balanced fund were the two top buyers of Fannie stock leading up to the end of the second quarter. And trust me, we were hearing word of problems there.

RYSSDAL: So what were these guys doing? These fund managers who were buying these companies?

VIGELAND: Well, basically, they made the prediction that the government would ride to the rescue, that it would prop up Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. What they didn't bet on was shareholders being last in line in a government bailout.

RYSSDAL: What do -- just to pick on them a little more -- Dodge and Cox, have to say about this?

VIGELAND: They did put up a statement on their website and, if I may paraphrase, they said, "Fannie and Freddie said they had plenty of money . . ."

RYSSDAL: Yeah. Right.

VIGELAND: Well, you know what, my mom said there was a tooth fairy.

RYSSDAL: Who else out there has been buying Fannie and Freddie?

VIGELAND: Well, let's look at Fidelity -- a mutual fund company close to us.

RYSSDAL: It manages our 403(b)s.

VIGELAND: And they are another investment firm that actually bought more Fannie stock as things were starting to get shaky. They added more than 10 million shares to their funds in the second quarter. That's 5 percent of Fannie's outstanding stock. And, some of the funds that you'll find it in -- Fidelity Equity Income, Fidelity Growth and Income. One familiar to you -- Fidelity Balanced Fund, which, as you mentioned, shaved off 447 of your dollars.

RYSSDAL: Run down the list of the other top 10, though. I mean, Fidelity's well known. Dodge and Cox. Some of the others?

VIGELAND: Oh, you've got Vanguard. You've got T. Rowe price. Hancock Funds. All of them now left holding the bag on both Fannie and Freddie. And speaking of Freddie... On the Freddie side -- we've been talking mostly about Fannie -- Wellington, the biggest recent buyer there. And Legg Mason, 80 million shares. More than 12 percent of the company, also after a recent buying spree.

RYSSDAL: Very quickly before we move on. Who was smart enough to get out of Fannie and Freddie?

VIGELAND: Well, Bloomberg did some research on that. We'll credit them. And they found that Oppenheimer sold off a whole bunch of Fannie and Freddie. And Capital World, which runs American Funds, also sold off. But they still own 1.5 percent of the company.

RYSSDAL: Lots of names, as I mentioned. Will have some links on our website, Marketplace.org, if you want to do some research for yourself. Tess Vigeland hosts our personal finance program. It is called Marketplace Money, which is why we call her for fun stories like this. Tess, thanks a lot.

VIGELAND: Thanks, Kai.

About the author

Kai Ryssdal is the host and senior editor of Marketplace, the most widely heard program on business and the economy in the country.

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