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Pfizer, and the cholesterol war

Mar 7, 2005
Today the world's biggest pharmaceutical company offered a peek at what it hopes will be the next big thing. The company already markets the world's best selling drug - Lipitor. It cuts so-called "bad" cholesterol. Pfizer's new drug boosts "good" cholesterol, and it's looking pretty solid in trials. If you put the good and the bad together, what do you get? A combo designed to deal with more than strictly 'medical' concerns. From the Health Desk at WGBH, Marketplace's Helen Palmer reports.
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Video games and the inner geek

Mar 7, 2005
It used to be dismissed as the domain of nerds. Nothing like money to improve a reputation. Just ask the folks at the annual Game Developers' Conference. It got underway in San Francisco today. The global video game industry is now worth upwards of $5 Billion. Any wonder that corporate America is ready to embrace its inner geek? As Marketplace's Jeff Tyler reports, that's show biz.
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These aren't chips from a bag

Dec 10, 2004
The stock market got a charge this week from National Semiconductor. Yesterday the chipmaker said its net income rose 22 percent in the last quarter. That's a lot of chips in a lot of cellphones, computers, and PDAs. Commentator and engineer Bill Hammack says you might be surprised at what fuels these icons of the new economy.
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Steroids and baseball - a winning combination ...

Dec 6, 2004
Here we are in December with baseball making the headlines. In recent days grand jury transcripts have emerged indicating several players used performance enhancing drugs - including steroids. The issue took center stage at the players' union meeting in Phoenix today. This, on the heels of remarks over the weekend from Senator John McCain - he's suggesting Congress might revoke baseball's long-standing exemption from antitrust laws. Marketplace's Matthew Algeo reports.
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DVD - The Next Generation

Nov 29, 2004
You know that new DVD player you bought last weekend? By the middle of next year, there's likely to be a new kind of DVD machine - a high definition version. You can't buy one today. Which is a little frustrating, given the hype today from one technology company. As Marketplace's Lisa Napoli explains, it just goes to show you how far in advance the jockeying for position - and consumer attention - begins.
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Murdoch's new push for the stars

Nov 29, 2004
Rupert Murdoch's Fox network is a major success on regular TV. His Fox News network has other cable news networks rethinking their approach to news. And now he's got big plans for satellite TV. Host David Brown talks to Fortune magazine writer, Adam Lashinsky about Murdoch's plans for the dish.
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A solar powered ... tent?

Nov 26, 2004
On this biggest shopping day of the year, shoppers are buying up electronics, clothes - and maybe some outdoor gear. One item that may hit the shelves in a few years could offer the comforts of home in the wild. Joyce Russell looks into the solar tent.
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"Hey you have a great ... bio!"

Nov 25, 2004
The Internet dating industry is doing very well these days, eager to match willing singles with that special someone. A lot of folks don't get past looking at pictures and personal bios online. But if your effort is to be a success, sooner or later, you'll have to meet someone. Preferably in public. And who knows - if you're at the International Internet Dating Convention in San Francisco, you might just bump into a guy like our own Cash Peters.
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TiVo changes the channel ...

Nov 17, 2004
You've heard of TiVo - the digital TV recording box. The company promises that its gadget will change the way you watch television. For most users that means getting to skip commercials. This feature has the TV industry scared. And so recently, Tivo has been working with broadcasters. As Marketplace's Ethan Lindsey reports, some users may feel a little betrayed.
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The new video frontier

Nov 9, 2004
Microsoft expects $100 million in revenue today from sales of one video game title - 'Halo 2.' Host David Brown talks to author Mitchell Wade about the video game industry and how first person shooter games will change workplace dynamics for the next generation of employees.
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