Forty three-year-old parapalegic Robert Woo is outfitted with an exoskeleton device to walk in made by Ekso Bionics as Manuel Maldonado (L) during a demonstration at the opening of the Rehabilitation Bionics Program at Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Center on December 6, 2012 in New York City. 
Forty three-year-old parapalegic Robert Woo is outfitted with an exoskeleton device to walk in made by Ekso Bionics as Manuel Maldonado (L) during a demonstration at the opening of the Rehabilitation Bionics Program at Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Center on December 6, 2012 in New York City.  - 

This month, a neuroscientist and his team announced that the ceremonial first kick at this year's World Cup opening in Brazil would be completed by a paralyzed teenager using an exoskeleton attached to her brain. Prosthetic robotic devices connected to the human brain are becoming more common. You may remember video a few years ago of a woman at the University of Pittsburgh feeding herself chocolate with a robot limb. For today's installment of Marketplace Tech's sports and tech series, "Gaming the System," we'll hear from a guy working in this field.

Dr. Michael Boninger, from the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, tells Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson about bioengineering and using brain signals to control exoskeletons and prosthetics.

 

Follow Ben Johnson at @@TheBrockJohnson