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Marketplace Morning Report

Is Georgia on national Democrats' minds?

Nov 20, 2019

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Toy tariff story

Nov 20, 2019
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Marketplace

Would forgiving student loans benefit the neediest?

by Ben Bradford Jun 26, 2019
Progressive economists dispute who would benefit most from erasing higher-education debt.
pxhere

Morehouse gift highlights philanthropy ... and black student debt

by Kimberly Adams May 20, 2019
Billionaire tech investor Robert Smith surprised Morehouse graduates by promising to pay off their student loans. Black students are more likely than white students to graduate with student debt, according to research.
Billionaire philanthropist Robert Smith pledged up to $40 million to pay off Morehouse College graduates' student loans at commencement on Sunday.
Morehouse College

Scandal sheds light on murky world of college admissions

by Amy Scott Mar 12, 2019
Some are calling it the biggest college admissions cheating scandal in history. Federal prosecutors allege that more than 30 wealthy parents paid college coaches and test administrators to boost their kids’ chances of getting into elite schools. The scandal is…
Stanford University sailing coach John Vandemoer arrives at Boston Federal Court for an arraignment on March 12, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. John Vandemoer is among several charged in alleged college admissions scam.
Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Applying to college amid the Harvard admissions lawsuit

by Justin Ho Jan 10, 2019
High school students weigh in on admissions policies and race as the college application season comes to a close.
A prospective student enters the Harvard University Admissions Building in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Glen Cooper/Getty Images
The Big Book

Inside today's fraternities

by Amy Scott and Maria Hollenhorst Jan 1, 2019
A lot of us have an image of what they look like. Is it justified?
Greek organizations "occupy this unique position where they are both dependent on universities and separate from them, and they are big businesses," author Alexandra Robbins says. Above, the Phi Kappa Theta fraternity house at San Diego State University in California in 2012.
Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images

U.S. colleges and universities are increasingly competing for international students

by Tracey Samuelson Nov 13, 2018
As colleges and universities around the globe put out the welcome mat for college and grad students from abroad, attracting those students is increasingly a marketing headache for schools in the U.S. Questions about racism, visas and the vibe on…
Pedestrians walk past a Harvard University building on Aug. 30, 2018 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Student loans make wealth gap worse for blacks

by Amy Scott Sep 27, 2018
New study examines race and student debt.
Students walk through the campus of Yale University. 
Yana Paskova/Getty Images

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Corner Office

Chegg's CEO says higher ed isn't set up for today's students

by Kai Ryssdal Sep 6, 2018
Dan Rosensweig saw a market in supporting modern college students.
Sarah Kerver/Getty Images for Chegg.com

Congress is set to vote on more mandatory financial counseling to help curb student loan defaults

by Justin Ho Sep 5, 2018
Student debt is topping $1.4 trillion dollars.
Students pull a mock 'ball & chain' representing the $1.4 trilling outstanding student debt at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, in 2016.
PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images

Young Syrians rethink their future as refugees in Turkey

by Reema Khrais Aug 31, 2018
Before the Syrian war in 2011, nearly 25 percent of young people went to college, which is almost completely subsidized by the government.
Othman Nahhas spends a good chunk of his paycheck paying for half of his family's rent in Istanbul.
Courtesy of Musab Yousef