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Historically Black colleges and universities are chronically underfunded

Nov 18, 2021
HBCU advocates say funding shortfalls mean less scholarship money and financial aid for students and can lead to lower graduation rates.
From 1957 to 2007, Tennessee State University, an HBCU, received far less money than it was due by virtue of its federal land-grant designation.
Damon Mitchell/WPLN News

Study finds tuition cost increases this year did not keep up with inflation

Oct 28, 2021
Colleges have struggled to retain enrollment in the pandemic, so there is pressure to keep tuition increases low
During a recession, college enrollment typically goes up, but that's not happening during the pandemic.
Getty Images

Student athletes, schools and conferences gain power as NCAA's wanes

Aug 13, 2021
State laws allowing athletes to make money and court decisions curbing the NCAA’s authority are reinventing big-money college sports.
The Texas Longhorns, the biggest moneymaker in college football, celebrate during a trophy presentation at the Alamodome in San Antonio. The team plans to leave the Big 12 to join the Southeastern Conference.
Tim Warner via Getty Images

EU student exodus may not hurt British universities after all

Aug 11, 2021
Fewer EU students in the U.K. may bring some financial benefits to British universities but it raises some political concerns, too.
EU applicants to U.K. schools have dropped dramatically following Brexit and a steep rise in tuition fees. Above, a student walks on the University of Glasgow campus in Scotland in September 2020.
Andy Buchanan/AFP via Getty Images

“America’s colleges and universities have a dirty open secret”

Aug 10, 2021
In his new book, journalist Adam Harris digs into the history of unequal higher education in America.
"America’s colleges and universities have a dirty open secret," writes longtime education reporter Adam Harris. “They have never given Black people an equal chance to succeed.”
Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images

Fewer students fill out FAFSA, enroll in college since pandemic began

Jul 21, 2021
The National College Attainment Network estimates that about 270,000 fewer high school seniors have filled out the FAFSA since 2019.
People mill about on the City University of New York campus. During the pandemic, the number of FAFSA applicants dropped, which means fewer eligible could students receive grants and loans.
Drew Angerer via Getty images

Are short-term job training programs worth it?

Jul 6, 2021
Boot camps and certificate programs have a mixed track record when it comes to getting people jobs that pay well.
Boot camps, certificates and other short-term programs have a mixed track record when it comes to getting people jobs that pay well, though they may be a solution for some looking to reenter the workforce.
Leon Neal via Getty Images

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School starts a Native American studies program amid reckoning over racial injustice

Apr 22, 2021
The University of Miami is moving to address a gap: "We have no Indigenous perspectives on our campus," one professor said.
The University of Miami is on ancestral lands of Indigenous people, including the Seminole. Above: A Seminole family displays their pottery outside their home in the Florida Everglades in 1974.
Fox Photos/Getty Images

Some college buildings are vaccination sites, but most faculty, students aren't eligible yet

Feb 24, 2021
Distribution of vaccines on campuses has sparked debate about whether students and faculty should be getting the shots.
Taylor Davis, 61, teaches at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. She said college professors should be able to get the COVID-19 vaccine once K-12 teachers are eligible. “I am more concerned about what an 18-year-old is going to do in their social time than I am a fifth grader,” she said.
Kirk Carapezza/GBH News

Liberal arts colleges look to career and tech education to bolster enrollment

Feb 2, 2021
With the number of high school graduates expected to shrink in New England and a shortage of people in tech, colleges see an opportunity.
Claudia Cabrera, who is taking advanced manufacturing courses at Stonehill College in Easton, Massachusetts, says someday she wants to help make robots.
Meredith Nierman