COVID-19

What live music looks like during a pandemic

Marielle Segarra Sep 11, 2020
Heard on: Marketplace
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Timbaland and Swizz Beatz, creators of Verzuz, at an event in 2019. The live shows streamed on Instagram and Apple Music pit two music icons against each other in live performance of their songs. Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Revolt
COVID-19

What live music looks like during a pandemic

Marielle Segarra Sep 11, 2020
Timbaland and Swizz Beatz, creators of Verzuz, at an event in 2019. The live shows streamed on Instagram and Apple Music pit two music icons against each other in live performance of their songs. Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Revolt
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You still can’t go to concerts, so what do you do for your live music fix? Millions of people are turning to Verzuz, a live webcast on Instagram and Apple Music, created by the producers Timbaland and Swizz Beatz. It pits two music icons — like T-Pain vs. Lil Jon, Snoop Dogg vs. DMX, and Brandy vs. Monica — against one another in live performance of their songs.

So the way this works is kind of like the artists are doing karaoke to their own music and each other’s. These are called battles, but they’re more like lovefests. 

During Snoop Dogg vs. DMX, Snoop is standing, he’s bouncing, he’s rapping along to DMX’s song.

There have been a bunch of these. Brandy vs. Monica’s battle got 1.2 million simultaneous views on Instagram, and more than a million people tweeted about it. 

And afterwards?

“They had 22 million streams in the U.S., and they were up overall … about 300, 400%,” said Larry Jackson, the global creative director at Apple Music, which has partnered with Verzuz. “They owned the entire R&B chart on Apple Music albums and songs.”

Jackson says Snoop’s album also climbed the charts. He thinks Verzuz could be around for a long time.

“Concerts won’t be returning for at least another year,” Jackson said. “So I think all of the societal circumstances are setting this up for this to be a long-running concept.”

Maybe one reason these battles have been so successful is that they’re coming at a time when we really need them. 

“They have been moments in which people have been able to transcend what has been tragedy and find a way to cope when we have physically been cut off,” said Tammy Kernodle, professor of musicology at Miami University in Ohio.

In particular, the Black community. The idea came from two Black producers — Timbaland and Swizz Beatz. It highlights Black artists. It’s a celebration of Black culture and music and enterprise. 

In her battle with John Legend, Alicia Keys talked about Verzuz this way.  

“This is such a powerful platform and there’s no denying it — 100% Black-owned,” Keys said.

The next battle is this Sunday: Gladys Knight vs. Patti LaBelle at 8 p.m. Eastern.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

With a slow vaccine rollout so far, how has the government changed its approach?

On Tuesday, Jan. 12, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced changes to how the federal government is distributing vaccine doses. The CDC has expanded coronavirus vaccine eligibility to everyone 65 and older, along with people with conditions that might raise their risks of complications from COVID-19. The new approach also looks to reward those states that are the most efficient by giving them more doses, but critics say that won’t address underlying problems some states are having with vaccine rollout.

What kind of help can small businesses get right now?

A new round of Paycheck Protection Program loans recently became available for pandemic-ravaged businesses. These loans don’t have to be paid back if rules are met. Right now, loans are open for first-time applicants. And the application has to go through community banking organizations — no big banks, for now, at least. This rollout is designed to help business owners who couldn’t get a PPP loan before.

What does the hiring situation in the U.S. look like as we enter the new year?

New data on job openings and postings provide a glimpse of what to expect in the job market in the coming weeks and months. This time of year typically sees a spike in hiring and job-search activity, says Jill Chapman with Insperity, a recruiting services firm. But that kind of optimistic planning for the future isn’t really the vibe these days. Job postings have been lagging on the job search site Indeed. Listings were down about 11% in December compared to a year earlier.

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