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COVID-19 pushes business bankruptcies higher in an already tough year

Sabri Ben-Achour Jun 19, 2020
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A "Store Closing" sign on a Pier 1 in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images
COVID-19

COVID-19 pushes business bankruptcies higher in an already tough year

Sabri Ben-Achour Jun 19, 2020
Heard on:
A "Store Closing" sign on a Pier 1 in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

J.C. Penney, Hertz, Gold’s Gym, oil driller Chisholm — all declared bankruptcy during the pandemic. 24 Hour Fitness filed for bankruptcy earlier this week. The fact of the matter is you can’t go far without practically tripping over a bankruptcy these days, and many economists say it’s going to get worse.  

Despite the government support and loans, it might just be too late for a lot of companies.

Twenty twenty was expected to be a bad year for bankruptcies before coronavirus. They were up 14% in the first quarter and are now up 20% from this time last year. Jared Ellias is professor of law at the University of California, Hastings College, who focuses on corporate bankruptcy law. 

“We are projecting a historic wave of bankruptcies over the next 18 months or so,” Ellias said.

How big of a wave is not totally clear — the pandemic has really messed with economic predictions. S. Abraham Ravid is professor of finance at the Sy Syms School of Business.

“The market does not seem to predict a horrible year,” Ravid said. “It predicts a bad year, but not a horrible year.”

For some sectors, it may well be horrible — retail, travel, oil. For companies that were in trouble before the pandemic, it may be too late. For others, it depends.

“The question is going to be whether the government can continue to prop up businesses and people at a level that’s meaningful long enough for the economy to get back on its feet,” said Michael Sweet, a bankruptcy attorney at Fox Rothschild.

The initial government relief packages were based on the assumption that businesses just needed a short bridge while things shut down for a month or two, said Carl Tannenbaum, chief economist at Northern Trust.

“It now appears that the span of that bridge is going to need to be a lot longer, and the pillars and support of that bridge are going to need to be stronger,” Tannenbaum said.

In other words, he said we should not underestimate the economic impact of the pandemic.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What do vaccines mean for economic recovery?

COVID-19 is not going anywhere anytime soon, according to expert witnesses who testified at a recent hearing held by the Joint Economic Committee. Put simply, we can’t eradicate the virus because it infects other species, and there will also be folks who choose not to get the vaccine or don’t mount an immune response, according to Dr. Céline Gounder at NYU School of Medicine & Bellevue Hospital. “That means we can’t only rely on vaccination,” Gounder said. She said the four phases of recovering from the pandemic are ending the emergency, relaxing mitigation measures, getting to herd immunity and having long-term control.

Can businesses deny you entry if you don’t have a vaccine passport?

As more Americans get vaccinated against COVID-19 and the economy begins reopening, some businesses are requiring proof of vaccination to enter their premises. The concept of a vaccine passport has raised ethical questions about data privacy and potential discrimination against the unvaccinated. However, legal experts say businesses have the right to deny entrance to those who can’t show proof.

What do I need to know about tax season this year?

Glad you asked! We have a whole separate FAQ section on that. Some quick hits: The deadline has been extended from April 15 to May 17 for individuals. Also, millions of people received unemployment benefits in 2020 — up to $10,200 of which will now be tax-free for those with an adjusted gross income of less than $150,000. And, for those who filed before the American Rescue Plan passed, simply put, you do not need to file an amended return at the moment. Find answers to the rest of your questions here.

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