My Economy

Finding joy after retirement, working at a vineyard

Bennett Purser Dec 31, 2019
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Cabernet Sauvignon grapes grown in Amissville, Virginia. Karen Bleier/AFP/GettyImages
My Economy

Finding joy after retirement, working at a vineyard

Bennett Purser Dec 31, 2019
Cabernet Sauvignon grapes grown in Amissville, Virginia. Karen Bleier/AFP/GettyImages
HTML EMBED:
COPY

“My Economy” tells the story of the new economic normal through the eyes of people trying to make it. This week we’re focusing on the work done by people 55 and older, the fastest growing segment of the labor force, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In his sixties, Chip Hunter retired from a government contracting position in Washington, D.C. According to him, it was time to leave that workplace, and let his younger colleagues take the lead.

He began exploring numerous part-time jobs. He tried delivering newspapers, working in a supermarket, and being a narrator at a historic park. While many of them didn’t stick, he eventually found a job he liked, pouring wine at a vineyard.

Chip Hunter in Loudoun County, Virginia.

“My part-time work has really helped me understand how difficult some of these jobs are,” Hunter said. “That we maybe don’t take full appreciation of until we try to do it ourselves.”

We’re here to help you navigate this changed world and economy.

Our mission at Marketplace is to raise the economic intelligence of the country. It’s a tough task, but it’s never been more important.

In the past year, we’ve seen record unemployment, stimulus bills, and reddit users influencing the stock market. Marketplace helps you understand it all, will fact-based, approachable, and unbiased reporting.

Generous support from listeners and readers is what powers our nonprofit news—and your donation today will help provide this essential service. For just $5/month, you can sustain independent journalism that keeps you and thousands of others informed.