Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
This Is Uncomfortable
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Missed “Marketplace” with Kai Ryssdal on air? Catch up here! Listen now

What your chocolate bar has to do with deforestation

Andie Corban and Kai Ryssdal Nov 8, 2019
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

What your chocolate bar has to do with deforestation

Andie Corban and Kai Ryssdal Nov 8, 2019
Matt Cardy/Getty Images
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Tropical deforestation is responsible for about 10% of global carbon dioxide emissions, according to the Woods Hole Research Center. This deforestation is accelerating, driven in part by growing demand for cocoa, which is mostly grown in West Africa. “Marketplace” host Kai Ryssdal spoke with The Washington Post’s Steven Mufson, who wrote about the challenges of sustainable chocolate production.

“It is terribly difficult,” Mufson said. Most cocoa farming happens on more than a million mostly small farms in West Africa. Poor cocoa farmers, looking to make extra money, often cut down trees so they can expand their plots.

Chocolate companies like Mars, which makes Snickers and Milky Way bars, have been trying to reduce deforestation for years. However, companies have struggled to figure out how to track the behavior of people on small, spread out farms in Ivory Coast and Ghana.

“A lot of companies are taking a more active role on the ground in these places,” Mufson said. “It’s a huge bookkeeping operation to do this, but more and more of that sort of thing is happening.”

Click the audio player above to hear the interview.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.