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Jan 23, 2020

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More employees are comparing notes and dishing on their pay

Mitchell Hartman Aug 28, 2019
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More employees are comparing notes and dishing on their pay

Mitchell Hartman Aug 28, 2019
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According to a report by global staffing firm Robert Half, 73% of workers surveyed have checked their salary against market rates within the last year, using online databases, salary guides and the like. Two years ago, just over half of workers had done so. And 54% of workers surveyed have compared their salaries, benefits and perks with co-workers.

Younger workers (aged 18 to 34) were the most likely to compare notes on their pay, said senior executive director Paul McDonald. “They’re used to sharing information more freely on social media,” he said. But, he added: “We highly advise against comparing with your colleagues. It is bad for morale if you find out that maybe you’re under-compensated.” Rather, he advises that workers use publicly available comparative job-market data to assess their current compensation and press for higher pay.

The survey found that 46% of employees surveyed feel they are underpaid. Women are more likely than men to think that — by 50 percent to 41 percent.

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