Will the college admissions scandal make the process more transparent?

Amy Scott Mar 14, 2019
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The media is seen outside the Edward R. Roybal Federal Building and United States Courthouse on March 13, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. Actors Felicity Huffman, Lori Loughlin and designer Mossimo Giannulli are among 50 people charged in a college admission cheating scheme that involves bribery and fraud in attempts to get students recruited as athletes and help them cheat on exams. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Will the college admissions scandal make the process more transparent?

Amy Scott Mar 14, 2019
The media is seen outside the Edward R. Roybal Federal Building and United States Courthouse on March 13, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. Actors Felicity Huffman, Lori Loughlin and designer Mossimo Giannulli are among 50 people charged in a college admission cheating scheme that involves bribery and fraud in attempts to get students recruited as athletes and help them cheat on exams. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images
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Anxiety about getting into college has perhaps never been greater, and the college admissions scandal uncovered this week highlights just how unclear the admissions process is. But at elite schools, admissions are a complicated mix of art and science, one they have little incentive to change or explain.

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