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This arcane constitutional clause could be trouble for Trump

Nov 22, 2016
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President-elect Donald Trump responds to a question from the press after his meeting with Andrew Puzder, chief executive of CKE Restaurants, at Trump International Golf Club, November 19, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey.    Drew Angerer/Getty Images

This arcane constitutional clause could be trouble for Trump

Nov 22, 2016
President-elect Donald Trump responds to a question from the press after his meeting with Andrew Puzder, chief executive of CKE Restaurants, at Trump International Golf Club, November 19, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey.    Drew Angerer/Getty Images
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The Foreign Emoluments clause of the U.S. Constitution — you might have skipped over it in social studies — says that no person holding any office of profit or trust can receive gifts from foreign powers. The idea was to prevent meddling in U.S. policy by other nations. Some scholars argue it doesn’t apply to the president, but presidents have certainly acted as if it does. And many scholars say it and statutes like it are a mine field for the future Trump Presidency.  

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