A person looks at a cell phone as Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the NAACP National Convention in Cincinnati. The sounds a phone makes can be as important as the look when it comes to selling power.
A person looks at a cell phone as Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the NAACP National Convention in Cincinnati. The sounds a phone makes can be as important as the look when it comes to selling power. - 
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Marketplace

Branding and advertising are all around us. Billboards, commercials, logos — they're ubiquitous. Often, without seeing anything — and sometimes without even knowing it — we're subject to another kind of branding: sonic branding. 

Like when the stranger next to you on an airplane powers up a laptop, and by the start up noise, somehow, your brain knows it's running Windows. Or when a phone rings, and you recognize the default Apple ringtone. 

Brands hope you associate positive things with their sonic ID — HBO wants you to remember its programming when it plays its feature presentation score before a new original movie. And phone companies strive to make un-annoying (but still recognizable) ringtones that will draw the right kind of attention. 

Connor Moore is a musician who does sound design for brands — he's worked with Amazon, Paypal and Uber Rush — and joined Marketplace Weekend to talk about the power of sonic branding. 

To listen to the full interview, tune in using the audio player above. 

Follow Lizzie O'Leary at @lizzieohreally