Marketplace has a new podcast for kids, "Million Bazillion!" EPISODE OUT NOW
Terry Bollea, aka Hulk Hogan, testifies in court during his trial against Gawker Media at the Pinellas County Courthouse on March 8, 2016 in St Petersburg, Florida. John Pendygraft-Pool/Getty Images

Hulk Hogan awarded $115 million in Gawker case

Tony Wagner Mar 18, 2016
Terry Bollea, aka Hulk Hogan, testifies in court during his trial against Gawker Media at the Pinellas County Courthouse on March 8, 2016 in St Petersburg, Florida. John Pendygraft-Pool/Getty Images

Hulk Hogan won big Friday in his lawsuit against Gawker Media.

The TV star and former wrestler was awarded $115 million in damages over a sex tape posted by the site in 2012. Gawker founder Nick Denton said in a statement that the company would appeal. The New York Times notes that Gawker, which now employs about 250 people accross seven different sites, had built up its finances to prepare for the trial. The jury found Gawker, Denton and then-editor AJ Daulerio liable.

Hogan — real name: Terry Bollea — began crying when the verdict was read, according to local news station WTSP.

Gawker had argued that the sex tape was newsworthy, and publishing it was within its First Amendment rights since Hogan is a public figure.

But, “Hogan’s lawyer Kenneth Turkel said during the trial that Gawker typified the often anything-goes world of internet publishing,” The BBC reported. “The verdict could lead to more caution among Internet news websites, which frequently have less editorial oversight than traditional media outlets.

We’re here to help you navigate this changed world and economy.

Our mission at Marketplace is to raise the economic intelligence of the country. It’s a tough task, but it’s never been more important.

In the past year, we’ve seen record unemployment, stimulus bills, and reddit users influencing the stock market. Marketplace helps you understand it all, will fact-based, approachable, and unbiased reporting.

Generous support from listeners and readers is what powers our nonprofit news—and your donation today will help provide this essential service. For just $5/month, you can sustain independent journalism that keeps you and thousands of others informed.