Greeks in crisis

People of Athens remain calm during debt crisis

Kai Ryssdal and Stephen Beard Jul 8, 2015
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Greeks in crisis

People of Athens remain calm during debt crisis

Kai Ryssdal and Stephen Beard Jul 8, 2015
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After bailout talks between Greece and its creditors broke down last weekend, the European Central Bank froze financial support to Greece’s banks. The Greek government has instilled a 60 euro limit (roughly $66) on withdrawals from cash machines.

But according to Marketplace’s Stephen Beard, it’s hard to tell that Greece is in a borderline-dire financial situation by looking around the city of Athens.

“You don’t see any serious signs of social stress,” Beard says. “You don’t see fist fights in the street or anything like that, but there are tell-tale signs of trouble.”

One of those tell-tale signs becomes apparent quickly for anyone visiting Athens, just as one would leave the airport.

“The government has made the subway system free,” Beard says. “I guess because they know that people are strapped for cash since the banks are closed and I guess also to mollify [citizens] … before the anger boils over.”

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