Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace

The GM strike marches on

Sep 20, 2019

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
This Is Uncomfortable
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Forget Congress: How Obama can fight climate change solo

Queena Kim Jun 25, 2013
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY

President Obama vowed to make climate change a priority and on Tuesday he’s giving a speech explaining how he’s going to do it. But with Congress divided on the issue of climate change, the President is expected to tackle the issue through an executive order. 

Presidents can order federal employees and agencies to enact regulations without approval from Congress, says Allan Lichtman, a history professor at American University. He says, throughout history,  presidents have used executive orders to make their mark.

“The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln was in effect an executive order. Harry Truman used an executive order to desegregate the armed forces,” Lichtman says.

He adds that companies and individuals can appeal to the courts, but it’s rare that they overturn executive orders. President Obama is expected to use an executive order to enact tougher regulations on power plants fueled by coal, says Kevin Book, managing director at ClearView Energy Partners. 

“You have about 2.3 billion metric tons a year of greenhouse emissions from the power sector,” he says.

That’s about a-third of the greenhouse gases produced in the United States. Book doesn’t expect the President to issue the order regulating coal plants tomorrow, but, he says, he will probably signal that one is coming soon.

 

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.