Last night's presidential debate about foreign policy covered a range of topics. As expected, the candidates touched on China and its high-profile relationship to the United States.
Last night's presidential debate about foreign policy covered a range of topics. As expected, the candidates touched on China and its high-profile relationship to the United States. - 

Last night's presidential debate about foreign policy covered a range of topics. As expected, the candidates touched on China and its high-profile relationship to the United States.

"China's both an adversary, but also a potential partner in the international community if it's following the rules," said President Obama. Governor Mitt Romney staked out a similiar position: "We can be a partner with China, we don't have to be an adversary in any way shape or form. We can work with them, we can collaborate with them, if they are willing to be responsible."

Romney also accused China of being a "currency manipulator," a charge he's repeated many times on the campaign trail. He says that's an issue he will tackle immediately if elected. For his part, President Obama said the best way for the U.S. to compete with China is to focus on improving its education system.

 

“I think the best compliment I can give is not to say how much your programs have taught me (a ton), but how much Marketplace has motivated me to go out and teach myself.” – Michael in Arlington, VA

As a nonprofit news organization, what matters to us is the same thing that matters to you: being a source for trustworthy, independent news that makes people smarter about business and the economy. So if Marketplace has helped you understand the economy better, make more informed financial decisions or just encouraged you to think differently, we’re asking you to give a little something back.

Become a Marketplace Investor today – in whatever amount is right for you – and keep public service journalism strong. We’re grateful for your support.

Follow Rob Schmitz at @rob_schmitz