BBC World Service

Libyan shopkeepers, citizens cope with military action

Tony Fallshaw Mar 24, 2011
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BBC World Service

Libyan shopkeepers, citizens cope with military action

Tony Fallshaw Mar 24, 2011
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STEVE CHIOTAKIS: President Obama’s getting hammered from the left and right over his decision to include American forces in the Libyan air campaign. Now the GOP-led U.S. House could take up a measure to de-fund the American effort. All the while, the economy inside Libya keeps taking a big hit.

Tony Fallshaw is part of the BBC crew in Tripoli being followed around by government monitors. He’s with us now. Thanks Tony for speaking with us.

TONY FALLSHAW: You’re welcome Steve. Good morning to you.

CHIOTAKIS: How has daily life been affected by the no-fly zone enforcement? The Allied campaign there?

FALLSHAW: Well, life seems to go on normally, although there is an edge about the city. Occasionally you can sort of break away and talk to maybe a local shop keeper that’s open. But many of the shops here are closed. I would say about 70 percent of the shops are closed, and the only shops I’ve seen open are sort of food shops, and you talk to people in there and they’re sort of quiet and slowly getting on with their business. But there is a slight edge in the air.

CHIOTAKIS: What’s the greatest need there right now Tony?

FALLSHAW: Yeah, when I’ve been out I’ve seen long lines of people cuing not only in cars, but also on foot with their gas cans. This morning I sort of talked to the government officials here and they tell me there’s been no power cuts in Tripoli, but you get the feeling people here are just preparing themselves just in case.

CHIOTAKIS: The BBC’s Tony Fallshaw in Tripoli. Tony thank you.

FALLSHAW: You’re welcome Steve. Goodbye.

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