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Letters: Trash bags, social networking browsers

Marketplace Staff Nov 10, 2010
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Letters: Trash bags, social networking browsers

Marketplace Staff Nov 10, 2010
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TEXT OF STORY

Kai Ryssdal:It’s Wednesday, ‘long about the second half of the broadcast, which means it’s your turn.

We were talking trash the other day — only in the best possible way, of course — about Hefty marketing a new line of black kitchen garbage bags.

Jessy LeClair was listening that day from Kyoto, Japan, where, she notes, the local government issues clear trash bags.

Jessy LeClair: So it’s very embarrassing for me, because sometimes I don’t exactly know what should be thrown away, what shouldn’t be thrown away, and I’m always worried that people will see through my trash bags.

Susana McCune of Susquamish, Wash., only uses recycled bags, she says, that are more biodegradable, so the color changes depending on what those bags are made out of.

Susana McCune: The color of the bag means that I’m taking steps to try to minimize my impact on the environment, and to try to ensure that what goes into the landfill gets to break down in the most expedient, safest way possible.

This week brought the new web browser RockMelt to us, designed — or so the marketing campaign went — to make it easier to use social networking applications. We were reminded by some of you that we forgot to mention one thing. There already is a social-centric browser out there. It’s called Flock, and it’s been around since May of last year.

Stephen Breton of Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., didn’t much care for my interview last Friday with Haitian author Edwidge Danticat. It was part of our Art of Money series. At the top of the show, he wrote, “You said this was one of the most economically news-filled weeks ever. So why did you spend time interviewing an author about Haitian art?” The story, he said, belonged on a different public radio show.

Dab Beishline wrote from Juneau, Ala., with another point of view.

Dab Beishline: As a father of an adopted daughter from Port-au-Prince who visits Haiti often, any recognition of the struggles facing the proud people of Haiti is greatly appreciated.

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