How green will the new Congress be?

Sarah Gardner Nov 20, 2006
HTML EMBED:
COPY

How green will the new Congress be?

Sarah Gardner Nov 20, 2006
HTML EMBED:
COPY

TEXT OF STORY

MARK AUSTIN THOMAS: When the Democrats captured both the House and Senate this month, environmentalists whooped and cheered. But just how green will this new Congress be? The Democrats have the slimmest of majorities in the Senate and the President still has veto power. From the Marketplace Sustainability Desk, Sarah Gardner reports.


SARAH GARDNER: Democratic committee leaders promise to hold hearings on global warming and several senators, including Republican John McCain, say they’ll push legislation to cap U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

But the Sierra Club’s David Willett isn’t holding his breath.

DAVID WILLETT: “I don’t think we’re going to see a major shift in how the U.S. federal government has dealt with global warming with George Bush still in the White House.”

Tougher fuel-economy standards will be a political stretch as well. So what green proposals could the new Congress pass?

Anna Aurilio at U.S. Public Interest Research Group believes this one has legs: rolling back the financial relief oil companies got in last year’s Energy Act.

ANNA AURILIO:“I think people will find it very, very hard to say no, in fact, big oil shouldn’t have to pay its fair share of taxes.”

The new Congress may also pass more tax incentives for renewable fuels.

I’m Sarah Gardner for Marketplace.

Marketplace is on a mission.

We believe Main Street matters as much as Wall Street, economic news is made relevant and real through human stories, and a touch of humor helps enliven topics you might typically find…well, dull.

Through the signature style that only Marketplace can deliver, we’re on a mission to raise the economic intelligence of the country—but we don’t do it alone. We count on listeners and readers like you to keep this public service free and accessible to all. Will you become a partner in our mission today?

Your donation is critical to the future of public service journalism. Support our work today – for as little as $5 – and help us keep making people smarter.