One-second advertising

Shia Levitt Jun 14, 2006
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One-second advertising

Shia Levitt Jun 14, 2006
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TEXT OF STORY

SCOTT JAGOW: I know we have short attention spans, but come on, one-second radio ads? As Shia Levitt reports, Clear Channel’s got ’em.


SHIA LEVITT: The one-second radio ads are called “blinks.” They would likely be used to promote already established products or be part of larger branding campaigns.

Some advertisers are skeptical. Bob Sproul is Vice President of a San Francisco marketing company. He says one-second ads might work, but not as the primary marketing tool.

BOB SPROUL: When you look at your watch, one second on the surface seems almost ridiculous. I mean if it was five seconds you could even get something across. But if it’s used in a very creative way within the context of a larger campaign where you have 30- or 60-second spots out there, it may very well be effective.

The super-short radio ads could use familiar sounds like a few notes of a company’s jingle.

In San Francisco, I’m Shia Levitt for Marketplace.

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