Safe drinking water gets harder to tap


  • Photo 1 of 6

    Foul-smelling water mixed with coal runs from Kenny Stroud's faucet in Rawl, W.Va. For years, residents of the Appalachian coal-mining town have had to rely on water trucks and deliveries for clean water.

    - Melissa Farlow/From Blue Planet Run

  • Photo 2 of 6

    Children walk on a water pipe in Mumbai, India. Because water is prohibitively expensive, many slum dwellers rely on leaks in the massive pipelines that carry water to more affluent neighborhoods.

    - Christopher Brown, Redux/From Blue Planet Run

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    Kenyan villagers on Pate Island gather brackish drinking water from holes in the sand, less than 300 feet from the ocean.

    - George Steinmetz/From Blue Planet Run

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    Children in Beijing show their reaction to polluted water in a jar. China's water is increasingly toxic. Seventy percent of the nation's major rivers no longer support life, and 25 percent to 33 percent of the population -- 300 million people -- does not have access to safe drinking water.

    - Fritz Hoffmann/From Blue Planet Run

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    Workers at the Pitztal Glacier ski resort in Austria roll out a fleece-like blanket to protect the snow and ice from melting in the summer months.

    - Melissa Farlow/From Blue Planet Run

  • Photo 6 of 6

    A fleece-like blanket on the Pitztal Glacier ski resort in Austria protects the snow and ice from melting in the summer months.

    - Melissa Farlow/From Blue Planet Run

About the author

Kai Ryssdal is the host and senior editor of Marketplace, public radio’s program on business and the economy.

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