Sarah Gardner is a reporter on the Marketplace sustainability desk. Her past projects include “We Used To Be China," "Coal Play," "Consumed,” “The Next American Dream,” “Jobs of the Future,” and “Climate Race,” among others. Gardner began her career at Marketplace as a freelancer and was hired as business editor and back-up host to David Brancaccio in the mid-90s. Prior to her work at Marketplace, Gardner was a public radio freelancer in Los Angeles, a staff reporter for New Hampshire Public Radio, a commercial radio reporter in Massachusetts and an editor/reporter for a small town newspaper in Minnesota.  She is the recipient of several awards including a Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Finance Journalism (1997), an AlfredI.duPont-Columbia University Award (1996-1997) and a George Foster Peabody Award, the oldest and most prestigious media award (2000). Gardner attended Carleton College where she received her bachelor’s degree in religion and Columbia University where she received her master’s degree in journalism. A native of Waukesha,Wis., Gardner resides in Los Angeles.


Features by Sarah Gardner

L.A. installs water pipes that can survive disaster

The Japanese-made pipes don't pull apart at the joints when the earth moves.
Posted In: earthquakes, infrastructure, water
The California Aqueduct is one of three  aqueducts bringing fresh water to Los Angeles. Here, where it meets the San Andreas fault, the aqueduct could break and potentially cut off some water supply in a large earthquake.

L.A.'s biggest vulnerability lies under its streets

A major quake could rupture the city's aging system of 7,000 miles of water pipes.
Posted In: infrastructure, earthquake, los angeles, southern California, water

Lucy Jones on why scientists need to craft stories

The seismologist explains how using narratives can get your message across.
Posted In: earthquakes, infrastructure, storytelling

California farmer is 'minimizing the hurt'

Senior rights holder reins in water use by a quarter to avoid harsher cuts later
Posted In: California drought, drought; agriculture; water markets; California
Weeds grow in dry cracked earth that used to be the bottom of Lake McClure on March 24, 2015 in La Grange, California.

California drought threatens even oldest water rights

In California, some people have more right to water than others. Now, drought threatens even them.
Posted In: water, water rights, california, drought

McDonald's first turnaround steps aren't about food

The company plans to cut costs, boost revenue, buy back its own shares.
Posted In: McDonald's, consumer, shareholders
The California drought has dried up reservoirs in the Bay Area.

Anti-tax measure complicates California drought effort

Higher water rates for conservation can violate a constitutional limit on fees.
Posted In: california, drought, Proposition 13, Proposition 218
Dry cracked earth is visible on a cantaloupe farm on Aug. 22, 2014 near Firebaugh, California. With the severe California drought, Central California farming communities have struggled to survive.

In California, farmers' water market is drying up

The market model for farmers in California who sell water is coming up short.
Posted In: drought, Agriculture, water markets; California

When water runs dry, farmers focus on profit

Farmers in the dry Central Valley raise the highest-value crops they can grow
Posted In: water, Agriculture, california, drought
Sprinklers water the lawn in Golden Gate Park on April 2, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

California drought prompts 25 percent mandatory cutbacks

Local water districts will restrict residential use, not agriculture.
Posted In: drought, groundwater, conservation, water


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