Amy Scott is Marketplace’s education correspondent. In addition to covering the K-12 and higher education beats, she files general business and economic stories for Marketplace programs and marketplace.org, drawing from her experience covering finance in New York.

Scott joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Scott hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the Middle East @ Work series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. She is now based in Baltimore.

In 2012 Scott and Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica. The stories led U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings to call for hearings on the conduct of for-profit colleges in the United States. Scott also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Scott worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. She spends much of her free time exploring Maryland’s hiking trails or playing various musical instruments. She is a long-time student and performer of Javanese gamelan music.

A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Scott has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

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Features by Amy Scott

The earliest of adopters

Toddlers are spending more time in front of mobile devices, and media companies are drooling over the possibilities of cashing in on the tiniest viewers.
Posted In: tablets, ipads, parenting, parent tech, mobile devices

What's a Schedule II narcotic?

Painkillers are some of the most abused drugs on the market. The FDA has been looking for ways to stem that abuse.
Posted In: FDA, painkillers, drugs

Making school meals free for everyone

About half of public school children today qualify for free and reduced-price meals at school. A new federal option allows high-poverty schools to feed all students at no charge.
Posted In: school lunches, Education

Obamacare: What we have here is a failure to integrate

After problems with the Coast Guard's massive Deepwater acquisition program, the federal government has moved away from hiring outside systems integrators, opting to coordinate big projects in-house.
Posted In: Obamacare, government contractors

Picky eaters: Making school meals that kids will eat

More than half of public school children now qualify for free and reduced-price meals. But getting kids to actually eat school meals can be tough.
Posted In: school lunches, education funding, public schools

How free lunches pay off for schools

Roughly half of public school children today qualify for free or reduced-price lunch, and that number drives billions of dollars in other benefits for schools. But critics say the program is prone to error and fraud.
Posted In: school lunches, education funding

Can Wall Street avoid another fiscal cliff?

Bank executives head to the White House to discuss the government shutdown and efforts to raise the federal debt ceiling. How much influence do the bankers have?
Posted In: government shutdown 2013, debt ceiling

NCAA video game deal could pave way to pay players

EA Sports announced it will stop selling its college football video game and separately settled a lawsuit with former players.
Posted In: college gameday 2013, college football schedule

U.S. companies defend the Common Core

Businesses rally behind a controversial new set of math and literacy standards, which they view as crucial to preparing an educated workforce.
Posted In: Education, common core, ExxonMobil, Intel

When you're the first to go to college

Last spring, Raven Gribbins was the first in her family to graduate from high school. Now she begins the next chapter -- as a college student.
Posted In: Oyler School, Education

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