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MARK AUSTIN THOMAS: Congress returns from its Memorial Day recess next week. One item on its agenda will be a bill to reverse a recent decision by the Supreme Court on pay discrimination. This week, justices ruled workers must file a suit within six months of the time they say they were first discriminated against. Nancy Marshall Genzer reports.


NANCY MARSHALL GENZER: Congressional Democrats say workers need more time to sue. The legislation would address the six-month limit, giving employees more flexibility.

Equal-pay advocate Lisa Maatz is with the American Association of University Women. She says it sometimes takes years for workers to realize they're being paid less than their colleagues.

LISA MAATZ: Within your first six months of employment, you're tending to try to make a good impression and be part of the team. You're not talking about salary.

But the bill's co-sponsors say they won't ignore employer's concerns.

Washington, D.C. congressional delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton says Congress knows businesses are worried they'll be sued for pay decisions stretching back decades.

ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON: Employers have a point that you can't simply say that violations we could know nothing about, you can somehow dredge them up. Reasonable time frames can be developed.

The bill's sponsors say the measure will be introduced next week.

In Washington, I'm Nancy Marshall Genzer for Marketplace.