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Marketplace Morning Report for Friday, January 23, 2015
Jan 23, 2015

Marketplace Morning Report for Friday, January 23, 2015

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Airing on Friday, January 23, 2015: First up on today's show, an update from Greece on an election that could alter the world economy. Plus, the President is set to make a visit to India. On his last trip abroad, President Barack Obama announced a pollution deal with China. We look at how India’s environmental pollution stacks up, and what the U.S. might do to curb greenhouse gas emissions there. And also, a paradox: Pharmaceutical companies often don't develop drugs and vaccines for infectious diseases like malaria and tuberculosis because there's just not much money in it. That's because most people with those conditions are poor and live in countries with health systems with little means to pay. What about other incentives to combat global health epidemics?

 

 

 

Segments From this episode

Greece prepares to vote, eurozone worries

Jan 23, 2015
The party leading in the polls wants to renegotiate Greece's bailout deals.

New effort ranks drugmakers by impact

Jan 23, 2015
The idea is to give companies another incentive to treat infectious diseases.

India's air pollution problem

Jan 23, 2015
Cities in India have air that's four times deadlier than Beijing's.

PODCAST: Retirement lost in the shuffle

Jan 23, 2015
A look at the U.S. dollar, more on the death of Saudi King Abdullah, and a retirement system that got lost in the shuffle.

Airing on Friday, January 23, 2015: First up on today’s show, an update from Greece on an election that could alter the world economy. Plus, the President is set to make a visit to India. On his last trip abroad, President Barack Obama announced a pollution deal with China. We look at how India’s environmental pollution stacks up, and what the U.S. might do to curb greenhouse gas emissions there. And also, a paradox: Pharmaceutical companies often don’t develop drugs and vaccines for infectious diseases like malaria and tuberculosis because there’s just not much money in it. That’s because most people with those conditions are poor and live in countries with health systems with little means to pay. What about other incentives to combat global health epidemics?

 

 

 

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC