Kimberly Adams

Correspondent

SHORT BIO

I cover the intersection between politics and the economy, with a special focus on how federal policy affects the bottom line for businesses and individuals.

What was your first job?

Dental assistant. (Flossing is crucial.)

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

The "biggest" stories are not necessarily the most important stories to tell.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Astronaut ... definitely an astronaut.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

How to pronounce "subsequently."

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

My mug, which says "I'm a Grown-A** Lady and I Do What I Want."

 

Latest Stories (599)

How much do you trust government data? It depends on your politics

Oct 15, 2020
According to the latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll, Biden supporters are less likely than Trump supporters to believe economic data from the federal government.
Thuli Katerere-Virima is one of 7% of Biden supporters who still have full confidence in government economic data.
Kimberly Adams/Marketplace

Voting-related legal challenges likely to continue past Election Day

Oct 13, 2020
Campaigns and outside groups are spending tens of millions of dollars on legal challenges leading up to the election, trying to avoid even more damaging — and expensive — fights after polls close.
People vote early in San Jose, California, on Oct. 13. More people are voting early or by mail due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Political parties, outside groups pour resources into preelection legal fights

Oct 8, 2020
They're spending tens of millions of dollars in court, fighting down to the wire over absentee and mail-in ballot rules.
According to the Standford-MIT Healthy Elections Project, there are more than 300 of these cases in 44 states.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Small-dollar donors are playing a much bigger role in this year's campaigns

Oct 6, 2020
They now account for nearly a quarter of all donations. This year, they are giving more than PACs and super PACs combined
People watch the first debate between President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden at The Abbey on Sept. 29 in West Hollywood, California.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Judge blocks Trump administration's temporary visa restrictions

Oct 2, 2020
U.S. District Judge Jeffrey S. White said the president had likely exceeded his authority.
A medical scientist runs a test at a University of Washington lab. The H-1B visa freeze affects jobs in science-related as well as other fields.
Karen Ducey/Getty Images

What Trump, Biden had to say about economic issues in the first debate

The Supreme Court, the Affordable Care Act, climate change and the reopening of the pandemic economy all came up.
Trump continued to say he wants the economy opened more quickly and continued to dispute his own scientists on whether it was safe to do so. Biden wants to take a more cautious and slow approach, basically arguing the risks aren’t worth it.
Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Is chasing swing voters a waste of campaign money?

Sep 28, 2020
Most voters have already decided whom they want for president, experts say. Will undecideds vote at all?
One swing voter researcher said "these voters may not be motivated to vote at all in the 2020 election."
Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Activist groups are helping formerly incarcerated Floridians vote by paying their outstanding fees and fines

Sep 23, 2020
Legal challenges to the fees continue, but they're not likely to succeed before Election Day.
Cliff Hawkins/Getty Images

Farmer aid agreement removes obstacle to federal shutdown negotiations

Sep 22, 2020
The GOP wanted increased funds for aid programs to farmers, but opponents said similar aid has gone to big corporations at the expense of smaller farms in the past.
A farmer walks back to his tractor as he plants corn on his Maryland farm. A dispute over funding for farmers was holding up negotiations to keep the federal government open.
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

New census data reveals more details about LGBTQ community

Sep 17, 2020
The data isn't perfect, advocates say, but it's likely to prove useful to government agencies and employers.
The U.S. Census found same-sex couples participate in the labor force at a higher rate than opposite-sex couples — almost 85% compared to just over 80%.
Visualspace/Getty Images