COVID-19

With COVID-19, big weddings give way to “planned elopements”

Sue Carpenter Jun 26, 2020
Heard on: Marketplace Morning Report
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A couple is married with just an officiant as friends join via Zoom in Virgina. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images
COVID-19

With COVID-19, big weddings give way to “planned elopements”

Sue Carpenter Jun 26, 2020
A couple is married with just an officiant as friends join via Zoom in Virgina. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Summer is wedding season, at least it is normally. COVID-19 has changed a lot of things, including nuptials. These days, more engaged couples are canceling their big day in favor of something smaller, often outdoors, with a handful of attendees.

The nature of elopement is evolving. What used to mean a wedding held in secret, often at a government building, now encompasses small planned events.

Couples want to get married quickly as states ease up on stay-at-home orders, knowing restrictions could be put back in place if the pandemic worsens.

There’s a financial advantage to elopement. According to the wedding website The Knot, the average cost for a wedding in 2019 was $34,000. Eloping is often a couple thousand bucks. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What’s going on with extra COVID-19 unemployment benefits?

The latest: President Donald Trump signed an executive action directing $400 extra a week in unemployment benefits. But will that aid actually reach people? It’s still unclear. Trump directed federal agencies to send $300 dollars in weekly aid, taken from the federal disaster relief fund, and called on states to provide an additional $100. But states’ budgets are stretched thin as it is.

What’s the latest on evictions?

For millions of Americans, things are looking grim. Unemployment is high, and pandemic eviction moratoriums have expired in states across the country. And as many people already know, eviction is something that can haunt a person’s life for years. For instance, getting evicted can make it hard to rent again. And that can lead to spiraling poverty.

Which retailers are requiring that people wear masks when shopping? And how are they enforcing those rules?

Walmart, Target, Lowe’s, CVS, Home Depot, Costco — they all have policies that say shoppers are required to wear a mask. When an employee confronts a customer who refuses, the interaction can spin out of control, so many of these retailers are telling their workers to not enforce these mandates. But, just having them will actually get more people to wear masks.

You can find answers to more questions on unemployment benefits and COVID-19 here.

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