Food aid need shifts from cities to countryside

Peggy Lowe Sep 24, 2018
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Small-town grocery stores like this one in southwest Iowa get 10 percent to 25 percent of their sales from federal food aid called the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, according to the Rural Grocery Initiative at Kansas State University. Peggy Lowe/KCUR

Food aid need shifts from cities to countryside

Peggy Lowe Sep 24, 2018
Small-town grocery stores like this one in southwest Iowa get 10 percent to 25 percent of their sales from federal food aid called the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, according to the Rural Grocery Initiative at Kansas State University. Peggy Lowe/KCUR
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Congress is working on the farm bill, a huge piece of legislation renewed every five years. The largest part of it — 80 percent — is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, what we used to call food stamps. Since the late 1970s, lawmakers have placed the nutrition program into the farm package hoping to get both urban and rural support. But that thinking might be outdated: Government data show a higher percentage of people in rural areas and small towns used SNAP than the rate in cities.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

As a nonprofit news organization, our future depends on listeners like you who believe in the power of public service journalism.

Your investment in Marketplace helps us remain paywall-free and ensures everyone has access to trustworthy, unbiased news and information, regardless of their ability to pay.

Donate today — in any amount — to become a Marketplace Investor. Now more than ever, your commitment makes a difference.