Small-town grocery stores like this one in southwest Iowa get 10 percent to 25 percent of their sales from federal food aid called the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, according to the Rural Grocery Initiative at Kansas State University.
Small-town grocery stores like this one in southwest Iowa get 10 percent to 25 percent of their sales from federal food aid called the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, according to the Rural Grocery Initiative at Kansas State University. - 
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Congress is working on the farm bill, a huge piece of legislation renewed every five years. The largest part of it — 80 percent — is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, what we used to call food stamps. Since the late 1970s, lawmakers have placed the nutrition program into the farm package hoping to get both urban and rural support. But that thinking might be outdated: Government data show a higher percentage of people in rural areas and small towns used SNAP than the rate in cities.

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