The changing balance of US-Russia relations

Eliza Mills Jan 13, 2017
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Director James Comey (2nd R) arrives at the U.S. Capitol for a classified briefing on Russia for all members of the House of Representatives January 13, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The internal Office of the Inspector General at the Justice Department announced yesterday that it is conducting a review on the handling of FBI and DOJ's investigation into the Hillary Clinton private e-mail server case.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The changing balance of US-Russia relations

Eliza Mills Jan 13, 2017
Director James Comey (2nd R) arrives at the U.S. Capitol for a classified briefing on Russia for all members of the House of Representatives January 13, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The internal Office of the Inspector General at the Justice Department announced yesterday that it is conducting a review on the handling of FBI and DOJ's investigation into the Hillary Clinton private e-mail server case.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
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In the past few weeks, there’s been a lot of news about Russia, from the DNC hacking, to the intelligence community’s conversations with President elect Trump about the Kremlin.

President Obama recently issued new sanctions against against the country, and ejected 35 Russian diplomats from the United States. 

To get a better sense of the economic and political relationships between the U.S. and Russia and what might change, Marketplace Weekend reached out to Matthew Rojansky, Director of the Kennan Institute at the Wilson Center.

Tune in using the audio player above to listen to the full interview. 

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