Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Nostalgia is driving up sales for Polaroid

Molly Wood and Daisy Palacios Nov 23, 2016
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Visitors check out the Polaroid stand at the 2014 IFA home electronics and appliances trade fair on September 5, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. 
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

More than a decade ago, and perhaps a few times after that, many people believed Polaroid was dead. While it had been a household name for years, many people thought the brand would die in the age of digital photography. But last year, Polaroid made somewhat of a comeback — and this year is looking even brighter.

“What we have found most recently is that there is a whole new generation of consumers who are buying these instant print cameras and experiencing instant photography for the first time,” said Scott Hardy, CEO of Polaroid. “These are the Gen-Y and the Gen-Z generations that are just infatuated with this retro photographic experience that we are able to provide.”

Over the last year, instant print cameras have experienced growing sales, as camera makers like Polaroid shifted their focus to target specific customers. One of Polaroid’s strategies, according to Hardy, is selling its products in the places these customers shop at.

“I think that the ‘hipsters’ are very much fans of what we do,” Hardy said. “If we look at where we sell many of our cameras, at places like Urban Outfitters, in addition to the normal consumer electronic places like a Best Buy, or an Apple store, Target, department store, or a Wal-Mart.”

Listen to the full interview by clicking the audio player above.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.