The next time you ‘Google’ it may be via drone

Nancy Marshall-Genzer Apr 15, 2014

Millions of people in developing countries still don’t have access to the Internet. Google would like to change that, which is why it’s acquired Titan Aerospace, manufacturer of solar-powered drones. 

The world’s most famous search engine plans to send the drones up to hover high in the atmosphere, beaming the internet down to earth. More people could ‘google’, but will these people like having drones peering down at them? 

We asked Patrick Egan, editor of the drone-focused sUAS News website, about privacy concerns: 

“I don’t think in this case it’s going to be a privacy issue. They’re going to fly at really high altitudes.  They probably won’t even have cameras on them.”

Google’s already experimented with aerial hot spots, using balloons, but drones are expected to be more reliable. 

“The winds at altitude can be pretty strong. So, the more controllability you have the better,” says Kurt Barnhart, director of the Applied Aviation Research Center at Kansas State University.

Plus, Titan says its drones can stay aloft for years, without refueling.

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