It’s all about the (new) Benjamins: A new $100

Adriene Hill Oct 8, 2013
HTML EMBED:
COPY

It’s all about the (new) Benjamins: A new $100

Adriene Hill Oct 8, 2013
HTML EMBED:
COPY

If you’re at the casino, or the bank, or withdrawing a large amount of money today — you may notice something different with your money.

The U.S. Treasury Department has printed new $100 bills and the Federal Reserve begins distributing it to banks. The new, more secure bills have been in development for a decade and even had to overcome production problems over the past few years. But the bills are ready now.

The bills feature a number of new security features to thwart counterfeiters, including a 3-D security ribbon with images that move in the opposite direction from the way the bill is being tilted, and a disappearing Liberty Bell in an ink well.

Almost $900 billion in $100 bills are in circulation around the globe, used for both legal and illicit purposes. And the $100 bill has become a much more popular and widely-used piece of currency. For instance, in 1990, $100 bills made up roughly 10 percent of all bills in circulation but by last year that figure was closer to 26 percent. At the same time, the value of $100 bills in circulation went from roughly 52 percent of all currency in 1990, to more than three-quarters of the value of all U.S. currency worldwide.

Rest assured, your old, 2-D $100 bills will still be legal tender — and accepted worldwide.

As a nonprofit news organization, our future depends on listeners like you who believe in the power of public service journalism.

Your investment in Marketplace helps us remain paywall-free and ensures everyone has access to trustworthy, unbiased news and information, regardless of their ability to pay.

Donate today — in any amount — to become a Marketplace Investor. Now more than ever, your commitment makes a difference.